Will designated patient navigators fix the problem? Oncology nursing in transition

Dimension: px
Commencer à balayer dès la page:

Download "Will designated patient navigators fix the problem? Oncology nursing in transition"

Transcription

1 Will designated patient navigators fix the problem? Oncology nursing in transition by Sally Thorne and Tracy Truant Abstract With increasing concern for equity and access across the cancer care system, we have seen expanding enthusiasm for various forms of designated patient navigators to facilitate coordination. While the intention is laudable, many of the popular implementation strategies risk accentuating strain upon the system and further complicating the coordination problem. These authors claim the motivation underlying the navigator movement can be reframed as an emerging recognition of the value of nursing work when it is optimally positioned to support patients, as they experience the cancer care system. This paper calls on Canadian oncology nurses to critically challenge navigation strategies, and adopt only those consistent with the significant reforms required to ensure a cancer care system so effective that external navigators are no longer necessary. Large numbers of patients living with, through and beyond cancer in Canada clearly and consistently have described their experience of the Canadian cancer care system as fragmented, sometimes inaccessible, and like a maze (Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control, 2002). Associated with these discontinuities of care are high levels of psychosocial distress related to unmet information needs, inadequate support, or communication breakdown, all of which negatively affect quality of life and increase the burden of suffering throughout the cancer experience (Bultz & Carlson, 2006; Bultz & Holland, 2006; Doll et al., 2003; Fillion et al., 2006; Fitch, Cook, & Plante, 2008). A variety of solutions have been proposed to address these issues, including patient navigation models that propose to improve the cancer experience for patients and families across the cancer journey. Background As enthusiasm for understanding the cancer journey has increasingly found its rightful place in the policy agenda, there has been a flurry of interest in the concept of patient navigators to ensure equitable and efficient access to cancer services and to bridge gaps in care across the cancer journey (Fitch, Cook, et al., 2008). The concept of patient navigators in cancer care originated almost two decades ago in Harlem hospitals, as a mechanism to correct what were considered unacceptable disparities in cancer mortality between minority African-American and other population groups (Darnell, 2007). The idea underlying the introduction of patient navigators was to identify populations with excess cancer mortality and to provide patients within those populations personal assistance in eliminating any barriers to patients obtaining timely and adequate diagnosis and treatment (Freeman, 2004, p. 76). As such, the patient navigator concept represented a passionate attempt to eradicate what were clearly recognized as unacceptable cultural, economic, societal and logistical impediments to timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment, so that all patients might benefit from the best available science and health care. Across the United States (U.S.), where access to health services remains decidedly uneven, the patient navigator concept advanced by Freeman was taken up by various reformers, and has eventually taken hold within the national policy agenda. In 2002, the National Cancer Institute began funding research programs directed toward this approach, as part of its Cancer Disparities Research Partnership Program (Dohan & Schrag, 2005), and had authorized the appropriation of significant funding to support considerable expansion of similar initiatives (Davenport-Ellis, 2007). Dr. Freeman, the originator of the patient navigation concept, was enlisted to lead the charge nationally. From this initiative, a number of projects have been launched and, as a result, the literature is now beginning to reveal an expanding body of knowledge related to the cost, efficacy and outcomes of various patient navigation models and approaches. The Canadian context Although the fundamental disparities inherent in the American health care system are not the primary challenge in our Canadian context, a shared and strong multicultural sensibility has led many Canadian researchers to document issues related to group differences that we continue to experience here at home. Thus, a deep concern for the politics of difference (Browne & Tarlier, 2008) has led many Canadian health system reform advocates to champion the idea of patient navigators, as the optimal solution to ensuring support for the most vulnerable of patients. Since all systems recognize that there are some individuals whose needs are sufficiently complex that providing care will disproportionately draw on system time and resources, the idea of navigators who might personalize attention to their needs has an obvious appeal. However, because Canada s health care system is built on the premise of equal access for a highly diverse population within a publicly funded system, deciding which particular diversities justify which kinds of special rights and privileges within the system is a complex and potentially divisive policy problem. Around the same time the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the U.S. had begun to establish funding for navigation research in 2002, federal funding was secured in Canada to develop a Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC), whose aims included ensuring equitable access to services and resources for all Canadians at risk/living with cancer. The CSCC, which eventually evolved into the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC), appointed various action groups to create a strategy toward meeting the needs of Canadians at risk for/living with cancer. The ReBalance Focus Action Group (now called the Cancer Journey Action Group) was established to shift the focus of cancer care beyond the diseasefocused issues associated with diagnosis and treatment, so that it would better meet the informational, physical, psychosocial, emotional, spiritual, nutritional and practical needs of patients and their About the authors Sally Thorne, RN, PhD, FCAHS, Professor and Director, UBC School of Nursing, T Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5. Phone: ; Fax: ; Tracy Truant, RN, MSN, Regional Professional Practice Leader, Nursing, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC. 116 CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

2 families across the cancer care journey from pre-diagnosis through to survivorship or palliative care and bereavement (Fitch, 2008). In the context of these national action group discussions, cancer patient navigation was identified as one potential strategy with which to meet the supportive care needs of patients and families across a fragmented, complex and sometimes inaccessible cancer care system (Fitch, Cook, et al., 2008). In this paper, we draw upon insights gleaned from both research and practice experience to reflect critically on the implications for both nurses and patients of uncritical endorsement of the current trend toward new systems of patient navigation. One of us comes from the perspective of longstanding engagement in consumer-based research involving persons seeking care for cancer within our Canadian health care system. The other brings the perspective of a longstanding clinician and leader of oncology nursing practice systems. We use the intersection of these distinct angles of vision to illuminate an alternative conceptualization of the fragmentation problem, critically reflect upon the current patient navigator agenda, and propose alternative strategic directions for oncology nursing within the Canadian cancer care context. The patient perspective Although chronic disease and cancer have historically been considered fundamentally distinct clinical specialties in nursing, it is increasingly recognized that they are prevalent in the same populations and share many common features relevant to prevention, supportive care and survivorship. When patients with cancer and chronic disease are asked how they experience the health care system and about their encounters with the people within it, it is perhaps not surprising that they describe rather similar patterns of what constitute essential system navigation problems. Further, a remarkably similar set of barriers, problems and challenges is reported not only on the basis of studies of populations who are vulnerable by virtue of sociocultural or economic disadvantage, but rather across the full patient spectrum (Decter & Grosso, 2006). Thus, notwithstanding the very real additional challenges experienced by certain linguistic or ethnic groups, for example, the challenge of negotiating health care seems a daunting one for all Canadians, and a matter deserving particular attention within the context of the patient cancer journey. A recent program of qualitative research into the patient experience of communication in cancer care by the first author (reported elsewhere) provided an opportunity to review and reflect on the stories of 260 British Columbian cancer patients representing a wide range of tumour sites, treatment modalities, and demographic features. Thematic patterns in relation to the patient navigation issue arising from this data set were discussed in depth with the second author, whose experiential involvement in cancer care process systems over this same period of time afforded the opportunity for a provider perspective of the same period in time. Reflective analysis of the study findings in the context of perceptions deriving from experiential practice allowed us to expand and elaborate upon trends within the research and explore additional interpretations. The ideas presented here evolved as a result of that analytic dialogue. What needs to be navigated? The primary care gap While it is well recognized that a coordinated cancer care system inherently relies upon high-quality primary care, not all Canadians have a family doctor, and those who do may have considerable difficulties with access (Decter & Grosso, 2006). Although system reforms are underway to expand the primary care system beyond the conventional family physician, who is often in solo practice, to integrated and interprofessional community-based networks (Canadian Institute for Health Information, 2008), the reform process has been protracted and painful (Murray et al., 2008). Where effective coordinated primary care exists, cancer patients are supported in accessing prevention, screening, early detection and accessing referral to specialty systems. However, far too often, primary care exists in the context of walkin-clinics, whose orientation is toward sporadic urgent care episodes rather than patient follow-up and continuity of care. Emergency departments have become the default primary care site for those who fall between the cracks. If we understand that the current organization of our entire system revolves around the assumption of an appropriately functioning primary care system, then we begin to appreciate how pervasive and extensive the navigation problem really is, and that approaches to addressing it within the cancer context have to begin long before a patient receives the cancer diagnosis. Fragmentation of specialization Once fully ensconced in the specialty cancer care system, patients continue to experience challenges with regard to continuity and collaboration among their cancer care team and specialists. It is increasingly acknowledged across all disciplines that what has driven conventional science in the direction of increasing specialization has concurrently created major gaps in our capacity to see the larger picture and understand issues at a system level (Dorr et al., 2006). While specialization has undoubtedly advantaged our capacity to answer certain questions, it has also created new problems. Because the holders of expertise within a specialty are inherently invested in advancing the primacy of that specialty within the system, and because society s dependence upon the services associated with expertise can be applied toward social persuasion or political influence, power struggles and turf wars have been allowed to flourish and to influence policy judgments in health system design and redesign (McKay & Crippen, 2008; McMurtry & Bultz, 2005). Although there is an increasing trend toward recognizing that complex adaptive systems such as health care require coordination and big system thinking at policy tables, the Canadian health care system continues to suffer from a historic reliance upon reductionist thinking produced by specialists within particular organ systems, treatment modalities, or services. While we commonly claim to value care coordination and patient outcomes, most members of the typical health care team are functionally accountable only for their own distinct piece within the service constellation, and very few have a formal mandate to even notice, let alone influence, what happens to patients across services and sectors. And, yet, we know that the care coordination problem is persistent and greatly detrimental to patient experience and outcomes. The cancer care team Even within specialized interprofessional cancer care teams, lack of collaboration and fragmentation of care are common problems, leaving patients to find their own way through the maze (Reid Ponte, Gross, Winer, Connaughton, & Hassinger, 2007). In order for patients to experience continuity of care across multiple care providers within the interprofessional team, often located across various settings, providers must communicate, trust one another, understand and respect one another s role and scope of practice, and maintain a collaborative sense of responsibility to their patients, as they guide them through the cancer journey (Fleissig, Jenkins, Catt, & Fallowfield, 2006). Further, the team needs to rally together around a patient-centred approach to care, which includes an intentional effort that consciously adopts the person s perspective about what matters and attends to the whole person (McMurtry CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été

3 & Bultz, 2005; Willard & Luker, 2005). In this way, effective interprofessional teams can optimally work together to close the gaps for patients across the cancer journey, thereby decreasing the need for an external navigator. Other blind spots within the system Our Canadian health care system, as with health systems globally, grew out of a time when curative physician services and hospital care were the exclusive focus of public policy regarding health care (Decter & Grosso, 2006). Over time, as knowledge has advanced, it has become apparent that health is an inherent feature of the societies in which we live, and that health promotion, prevention and disease management are far more influential on the overall health of society than is intervention toward cure (McKenna & Zohrabian, 2009). Despite such advances, many elements of health service structure remain firmly aligned with the assumptions upon which health service delivery was originally established. For example: our policies overemphasize service entrance restriction to the point that it is counterproductive to appropriate access; we often consider knowledge to be the prerogative of the professional and not the patient; we organize the vast majority of care around the assumption that the physician is the most appropriate team captain; and we favour reactivity over pro-activity in relation to service provision for predictable patient and population problems (Epping-Jordan, Pruitt, Bengoa, & Wagner, 2004). While numerous individual health care professionals and even groups of professionals sense the fundamental flaws in these system elements and strive to overcome them in their everyday practice, their efforts are often thwarted by an overall structural and philosophical resistance to change that seems endemic to health care systems (Fleissig et al., 2006). The communication challenge Somewhere within the context of these rather massive structural and attitudinal features of the health care system are the individual workers and care providers with whom each cancer patient will interact, either directly or indirectly. For most patients, these people become the face of the health care system, and the human manifestations of its capacity and willingness to help them during their time of need (Thorne, Kuo, et al., 2005). Although each of us recognizes how fundamental communication is to the human condition, the ubiquitousness of communication makes it quite difficult to address formally, as a clinical competency or a service system attribute. Thus, while we might generally appreciate that good communication adds value, we have very little hard evidence that any one communication approach is universally preferable to any other, or that any specific instance of communication in which we engage has any correlation to meaningful clinical outcomes (Thorne, Hislop, Armstrong, & Oglov, 2008). Thus, until recently, communication featured primarily as a motherhood abstraction in organizational values statements and vague commitments in terms of practice standards, with very little explicit attention in professional or system performance assessment. However, as advances in systems analysis bring the role of communication in coordination, patient safety, and outcomes increasingly into focus, there seems a newfound interest in paying attention to what patients have been telling us all along that communication really does matter (Thorne, Bultz, Baile, & SCRN Communication Team, 2005). Where should we be going? Serious attention to what patients and advocacy groups are telling us about the disjunctures within our system forces us to recognize that we operate within a cancer care system that was not designed with a patient-centred approach or the patient journey in mind. In the context of these recurring coordination problems, it is, perhaps, understandable that designated patient navigators have quickly captured widespread attention as a viable solution. However, on the basis of our analysis of the situation gleaned from extensive patient interviewing and from frontline practice, we are convinced that it is important for Canadian oncology nurses to reflect carefully and critically on this trend and to consider what it might mean for us, for the system and, ultimately, for patients. Here, we raise concerns related to the context in which navigation models have arisen, the potential unintended consequences of some of the various models, and the fundamental problem inherent in delegating navigation to a designated set of additional health care workers. Critiquing the navigation agenda Without question, navigation seems to have become the presenting symptom of a system with inherent ideological, cultural and organizational problems. While few would seriously question the potential benefit of designated navigation for certain vulnerable populations (Wells et al., 2008), the specific circumstances that have created the navigation problem in the Canadian health care system are not the same as those from which the patient navigator movement arose in the U.S. Instead of reflecting systemic racism that disadvantaged one population over another, our coordination issues, for the most part, derive from the embedded attitudes and ideologies that entrench old ways of conceptualizing issues of health care access, scope and responsibility (World Health Organization, 2002). Thus, if we recognize that these factors affect the broad population rather than a few particularly disadvantaged individuals, then our equal access commitment would suggest that if navigators are needed to manage within the system, they ought to be needed by patients across the full spectrum of ethnic and social groupings. The recent upsurge of enthusiasm by both planners and administrators in aligning with consumer groups to promote a navigation agenda (Doll et al., 2003; Fischer, Sauaia, & Kutner, 2007; Freund et al., 2008; Nguyen & Kagawa-Singer, 2008; Schwaderer & Itano, 2007; Seek & Hogle, 2007) seems to us a superficial remedy to try to correct a significant dysfunction within the system. While it may be completely understandable that anxious patients would welcome the idea of having someone to guide them through a broken system, we would argue that covering up a mortal wound only delays determination of the root cause for the bleeding. The introduction of designated patient navigators can, therefore, be seen as a well intended, but potentially quite misguided attempt to Band- Aid what is a much larger and more fundamental system integrity problem (Sofaer, 2009; Wells et al., 2008). What is badly needed is a serious public sector commitment to directional change in how we do business in health care (Skrutkowski et al., 2008). Therefore, we owe it to Canadians to try to address the fundamental causes of these current disjunctures, rather than simply attempting to splint them with the quick introduction of a new category of health care worker. When we insert designated patient navigators into the system, while we may temporarily ameliorate certain problems, we also inadvertently contribute to a much more worrisome set of difficulties pertaining to human resource distribution, relational strain within the health care team, and system accountability. For example, where designated navigators are drawn away from the general cancer nursing workforce, we place additional strain upon this already scarce resource, paradoxically increasing the need for external patient navigation. Where non-professionals or lay navigators are injected into the system, as patient advocates, that role poses a significant potential for adversarial interactions, including a predictable tendency to blame individuals and services rather than understanding systemic factors. We may, therefore, increase the level of distrust patients have for their professional health care providers and increase the frequency of litigious responses 118 CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

4 where issues arise. This would be of particular concern where lay navigation extends beyond supporting the specific challenges faced by particularly disadvantaged patients in collaboration with a nursing team and becomes more broadly positioned. Thus, while nurse navigators certainly have the knowledge and skill to meet patients immediate navigation needs, and while informed lay persons may bring experiential knowledge of how to work systems, both models may place the overall system at increased risk for exacerbating the problems that created the need for navigation in the first place. Another aspect of this problem is the fundamental assumption that designated navigators are responding to systems rather than becoming an inherent part of them. In the majority of contemporary models being advanced in the literature, designated patient navigators exist as a resource to patients, as they find their way through systems, and not as an integral member of the health care team (Sofaer, 2009). In essence, they operate like the kindly tour bus driver, who may ensure you are going in the right direction and disembark at the right stop, and who may even help download your luggage, but cannot accompany you to your final destination. The separation of responsibility for navigation from the core function of the interprofessional health care team seems to take us further from resolving the systemic issues that fragment care. Thus, the navigation agenda, as it is currently being conceptualized and enacted, seems to absolve health professionals, the health care team, and system administrators from responsibility for causing, perpetuating and, indeed, resolving the essential coordination problem. In advocating the introduction of a new cottage industry in the form of designated specialist whose exclusive role is to help patients through the system, it creates an additional layer of activity that, itself, will require coordination and a group of workers who may (if one takes a cynical perspective, and our patients often do) become invested in ensuring that the system remains insufficiently well coordinated to justify the continuation of their services. In contrast, what we really need is a health care team within which the navigation capacity is self-generating and fully integrated (Fitch, 2008; Fitch, Porter, & Page, 2008). While it makes obvious sense for one member of a well-functioning multidisciplinary health care team to serve as the primary coordinator for the inherent complexities associated with information, management, support and follow-through for each person who enters the system as an actual or potential patient, the imperative of patient navigation ought still to be a shared value across all team members. If we believe that comprehensive, coordinated care optimizes patient outcomes, then navigation issues must be considered as fundamentally important as diagnostic, clinical management or support service issues within our multidisciplinary health care team deliberations and activities. Thus, it seems most appropriate that nursing assume a leading role in taking up the general idea of patient navigation, understanding what motivates it and what it is designed to solve, so as to create the kinds of service structures and processes that will integrate the ideal into the everyday enactment of professional practice and system design. Considering what this means for nursing Open and enthusiastic critical deconstruction of how the health care system has evolved into what we now experience is a useful and enlightening beginning. Once we recognize the ways in which our political, professional and scientific history are a powerful determinant of our current assumptions and actions, we can better position ourselves to become part of what is needed to rebuild a system that prioritizes issues like patient experience and continuity of care. With an understanding of how we got here, we are better prepared to become major contributors to meaningful solutions and, indeed, failure to act makes us complicit in sustaining those barriers to optimal patient care. While nurses are often quick to criticize other health professions for their narrow specialty focus, our profession also reflects many of the same shortcomings. For example, relatively few nurses self-identify as having a particular interest or expertise in primary care. However, if primary care is the fundamental coordinating structure that explains how and why patients gain access to our services, we must make it a collective disciplinary priority to be actively engaged in solving primary care problems. Further, even within specialty care areas such as oncology, nursing sub-specialization into areas such as systemic therapy, radiation therapy, and palliative care has the potential to intensify the fragmentation problem. It is essential that we find ways to quickly understand and seamlessly share the patient s story, from the patient s perspective, across disciplines, specialties and settings. It also goes without saying that we need to work toward better communication between parts of the system (including services, professions, and, of course, the patient) and to ensure an appropriate system of transitions between team players. As environments in which the human diversity of the inhabitants is a celebrated strength, health care systems should no longer tolerate privileging the needs of certain providers over others and over the needs of patients. We know that it is impossible to build an effective baseball team from a few star pitchers and a group of batboys. What is needed is a well-differentiated group of skilled players, each understanding and enacting his or her unique role, albeit knowing and caring enough about the roles of others to cover all bases, as needed. If the team doesn t click, no matter how many stars are on board, it doesn t succeed. In health care, as in baseball, we need a deep-rooted and unshakeable shared commitment to interprofessional and multidisciplinary team playing. Beyond system communication, we also have a key role to play in advancing expectations regarding interpersonal communication. Communication is the context in which information is conveyed, expectations are guided, and compassion is expressed. It is well established that interpersonal communication gaps or inadequacies between professionals and with patients are at the root of the majority of health system failures and errors (Epstein & Street, 2007). Recognizing the centrality of communication, we must work to ensure we behave as if we recognize its importance. While we would not hesitate to act upon a medication error, we tend toward silence or withdrawal in the context of a communication error, even though its impact may be just as devastating for the patient. We must never forget that it is well within our power to enact and demand an expected standard of communication across all health care interactions. Indeed, these abiding values for teamwork and communication ought to apply to everyone privileged to hold a role within the cancer care system. Whether one is the parking attendant, the CEO, or any provider of services in between, we all have an essential role to play in facilitating patient-centred care along the cancer patient journey. Proposing strategic alternatives The complex skill set associated with understanding diagnostic and care pathways, interpreting concepts and information across disciplinary cultures and finding ways to be optimally positioned for vigilant stewardship of the patient experience has long been the conventional role of the nurse within the hospital sector. While the 24/7 work world of hospital care situates nursing well to enact these roles in the inpatient context, a significant proportion of cancer care takes place in ambulatory settings. However, in the ambulatory context, in particular, the work of oncology nurses is often structured in a manner designed to serve oncologists or treatment services, rather than to coordinate patients needs across their cancer journey. CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été

5 References Browne, A.J., & Tarlier, D.S. (2008). Examining the potential of nurse practitioners from a critical social justice perspective. Nursing Inquiry, 15(2), Although many groups of nurses have recognized this essential problem and made great strides toward addressing it, some jurisdictions in Canada have demonstrated significant resistance to the reorganization of nursing within ambulatory care, in the mistaken belief that supporting physicians and treatments prevents error. However, once we recognize the enormity of the threats to patient safety occasioned by a failure to communicate and coordinate, it makes sense to try to strengthen, not reduce, the capacity of nursing through positioning in such a manner that navigation becomes possible. This requires not only recognition of the value of that role within the system, but also policies and practices that ensure direct patient access, permit time distribution to be determined by patient rather than system need, and ensure continuity across services and sectors (Schroeder, Trehearne, & Ward, 2000). Where it has been recognized that supporting oncology nurses to organize in ways that facilitate these functions, such as with the infirmière pivot en oncologie (IPO) initiative in Quebec, there is an emerging body of evidence suggesting that systems can become more efficient and effective and patients can fare better in understanding their care and transitioning safely through it (Chasen & Dippenaar, 2008; De Serres & Beauchesne, 2000; Fillion et al., 2006; Mick, 2008; Skrutkowski et al., 2008). Despite the very real complexities associated with this kind of research on the impact of nursing roles on patient outcomes, it is important that nursing continues to work toward evaluation of system and patient impacts of various models of navigational support. Conclusions There are increasing signs that we are entering a time in which it becomes possible to create a coordinated voice for change. Advances in our capacity to extract, analyze and interpret population data are producing indisputable evidence that meaningful system change requires the full spectrum of engagement from prevention through specialty practice, from patients and the general public to professional and governmental stakeholders. Further, such change will require breaking down the fragmenting effects of specialization and learning to conceptualize complex problems at more global levels. In Canada, for example, we are seeing such innovations as collaboration across various chronic disease and cancer organizations to join forces toward a strategic national agenda for health promotion and disease prevention. Just as the wider society is beginning to grab hold of an appreciation that environmental change is the kind of issue that requires all of us to make a difference, there is a dawning recognition that we each can play a meaningful part in steering health care toward the kind of effective and efficient system that our society requires. We may even discover unexpected opportunities with the added catalyst that an economic recession provides to reset how we deliver care and articulate a more realistic priority framework. In this context, oncology nurses must individually and collectively appreciate that they are integral agents of system quality and not mere bystanders in a system controlled by others. As a myriad of system fixes arise within our various jurisdictions across the country, Canada s oncology nurses must ensure that they possess solid mechanisms with which to critically interpret these trends and mobilize collective actions to best possible solutions. While our profession may have a history of assuming a victim mentality in relation to the order and organization of health care (Kitson, 2004), now seems the time for renewed self-confidence and for strategic action. The enthusiasm for investment in navigation actually confirms the inherent value of what we generally consider the invisible work of nursing, something we have championed long and hard to justify within the planning agenda. Patients and those responsible for planning and administering cancer care systems may not always understand that strengthening the nursing system is the answer, and it will be our job to ensure that they make the associative link between what is needed and what we are capable of delivering. We need to reframe their perspective so they appreciate that a system in need of navigation is one in which nurses are not yet being optimally deployed. That coordination is a fundamental problem in health care, and one that can have a profound impact upon patients and outcomes, is a familiar insight for nurses. We have been painfully aware of these issues over the decades, and experienced considerable frustration in our attempts to address them. However, we seem to have before us a new opportunity derived from relatively recent evidence and also new high-level (national and international) policy support for system improvements. The kinds of care coordination, interprofessional teamwork, and shared care changes in health service delivery that many global health policy advocates are now suggesting fit nicely with the kinds of trends that nursing has consistently proposed. Nurses must always be sensitive to the fine line between advocating for nursing and advocating for patients from a distinctly nursing perspective. In this instance, the goals of our advocacy are not at all about advancing the profession; rather they arise out of an abiding conviction informed by the unique and distinctive perspective that comes from being a nurse in close proximity to the way patients experience both their cancer and the health care services to which they have access. We know that, where nursing is well positioned within an informed care coordination capacity, and is appropriately situated to interpret the myriad of patient concerns within the interprofessional team context, nurses are the ideal team member to ensure that no patient gets lost in the shuffle. In other words, the stronger the system of nursing, the less there will be any need for dedicated or external navigators. From our perspective, the collective voice of nursing must be raised at this critical juncture in our history toward ensuring that the organization of the workforce across the cancer care system fully optimizes nursing s individualization and coordination functions. The old model of organizing oncology nursing as handmaiden to the specialist seriously underutilizes the sophisticated competencies that nursing brings to the system, and perpetuates the fragmentation that so dangerously compromises patient outcomes. Our collective objective at this time in our history must be to ensure that all cancer patients and family members have consistent and timely direct access to nurses who are positioned in such a manner that they can come to know patients as unique individuals within their own distinct contexts, skillfully coordinate their transitions, and serve as their engaged and integrated knowledge brokers across the full spectrum of clinicians, teams, and services within the cancer care system. Thus, patient navigators will not solve the problem. In fact, our goal should be a cancer care system so effective that designated patient navigators are no longer needed. Strengthening the capacity of nursing through creative role reconfiguration and responsibility enhancement within the fully functioning interprofessional care team is the key to achieving that goal. Bultz, B.D., & Carlson, L.E. (2006). Emotional distress: The sixth vital sign Future directions in cancer care. Psycho-Oncology, 15, CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

6 Bultz, B.D., & Holland, J.C. (2006). Emotional distress in patients with cancer: The sixth vital sign. Community Oncology, 3(4), Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2008). Health care in Canada Ottawa: CIHI. Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control. (2002). Supportive care/cancer rehabilitation workgroup: Final report. Ottawa, ON: Author. Chasen, M.R., & Dippenaar, A.P. (2008). Cancer nutrition and rehabilitation: Its time has come! Current Oncology, 15(3), Darnell, J. (2007). Patient navigation: A call to action. Social Work, 52(1), Davenport-Ellis, N. (2007). Access to healthcare: Using data from a non-profit advocacy practice to drive policy change. In J.A.L. Earp, E.A. French, & M.B. Gilkey (Eds.), Patient advocacy for health care quality: Strategies for achieving patient-centered care (pp ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. De Serres, M., & Beauchesne, N. (2000). L intervenant pivot en oncologie, un rôle d évaluation, d information et de soutien pour le mieux-être des personnes atteintes de cancer [The pivot nurse in oncology, an evaluation, information, and support role for the well-being of people with cancer]. Quebec: Gouvernement du Quebec. Decter, M., & Grosso, F. (2006). Navigating Canada s health care: A user guide to getting the care you need. Toronto: Penguin. Dohan, D., & Schrag, D. (2005). Using navigators to improve care of underserved patients: Current practices and approaches. Cancer, 104(4), Doll, R.D., Stephen, J., Barroetavena, M.C., Linden, W., Poole, G., & Habra, M. (2003). Patient navigation in cancer care: Program delivery and research in British Columbia. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 13(3), 193. Dorr, D.A., Wilcox, A., Burns, L., Brunker, C.P., Narus, S.P., & Clayton, P.D. (2006). Implementing a multidisease chronic care model in primary care using people and technology. Disease Management, 9(1), Epping-Jordan, J.E., Pruitt, S.D., Bengoa, R., & Wagner, E.H. (2004). Improving the quality of health care for chronic conditions. Quality & Safety in Health Care, 13, Epstein, R.M., & Street, R.L. (2007). Patient-centered communication in cancer care: Promoting healing and reducing suffering. Bethesda, MD: NIH Publication No Fillion, L., de Serres, M., Lapointe-Goupil, R., Bairati, I., Gagnon, P., Deschamps, M., et al. (2006). Implementing the role of patientnavigator nurse at a university hospital centre. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 16(1), Fischer, S.M., Sauaia, A., & Kutner, J.S. (2007). Patient navigation: A culturally competent strategy to address disparities in palliative care. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 10(5), Fitch, M.I. (2008). Supportive care framework. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 18(1), Fitch, M.I., Cook, S., & Plante, A. (2008). Cancer patient navigation workshops: Improving access to cancer care. A report by the Cancer Journey Action Group. Toronto, ON: Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. Fitch, M.I., Porter, H.B., & Page, B.D. (Eds.). (2008). Supportive care framework: A foundation for person-centred care. Pembroke, ON: Pappin Communications. Fleissig, A., Jenkins, V., Catt, S., & Fallowfield, L. (2006). Multidisciplinary teams in cancer care: Are they effective in the UK? Lancet Oncology, 7, , 7, Freeman, H.P. (2004). Poverty, culture, and social injustice: Determinants of cancer disparities. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 54, Freund, K.M., Battaglia, T.A., Calhoun, E., Dudley, D.J., Fiscella, K., Paskett, E., et al. (2008). National Cancer Institute patient navigation research program: Methods, protocol, and measures. Cancer, 113(12). Kitson, A. (2004). Drawing out leadership [editorial]. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 48(3), 211. McKay, C.A., & Crippen, L. (2008). Collaboration through clinical integration. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 32(2), McKenna, M.T., & Zohrabian, A. (2009). U.S. burden of disease: Past, present and future. Annals of Epidemiology, 19, McMurtry, R., & Bultz, B.D. (2005). Public policy, human consequences: The gap between biomedicine and psychosocial reality. Psycho-Oncology, 14, Mick, J. (2008). Factors affecting the evolution of oncology nursing care. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 12(2), Murray, S., Silver, I., Patel, D., Dupuis, M., Hayes, S.M., & Davis, D. (2008). Community group practices in Canada: Are they ready to reform their practice? Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 28(2), Nguyen, T.-U.N., & Kagawa-Singer, M. (2008). Overcoming barriers to cancer care through health navigation programs. Seminars in Oncology Nursing, 24(4), Reid Ponte, P., Gross, A.H., Winer, E., Connaughton, M.J., & Hassinger, J. (2007). Implementing an interdisciplinary governance model in a comprehensive cancer center. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(3), Schroeder, C.A., Trehearne, B., & Ward, D. (2000). Expanded role of nursing in managed care. Part II: Impact on outcomes of costs, quality, provider and patient satisfaction. Nursing Economics, 18(2), Schwaderer, K.A., & Itano, J.K. (2007). Bridging the healthcare divide with patient navigation: Development of a research program to address disparities. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(5), Seek, A.J., & Hogle, W.P. (2007). Modeling a better way: Navigating the healthcare system for patients with lung cancer. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(1), Skrutkowski, M., Saucier, A., Eades, M., Swidzinski, M., Ritchie, J., Marchionni, C., et al. (2008). Impact of a pivot nurse in oncology on patients with lung or breast cancer: Symptom distress, fatigue, quality of life, and use of healthcare resources. Oncology Nursing Forum, 35(6), Sofaer, S. (2009). Navigating poorly charted territory: Patient dilemmas in health care nonsystems. Medical Care Research and Review, 66(1), 75S 93S. Thorne, S.E., Bultz, B.D., Baile, W.F., & SCRN Communication Team. (2005). Is there a cost to poor communication in cancer care?: A critical review of the literature. Psycho-Oncology, 14, Thorne, S.E., Hislop, T.G., Armstrong, E.A., & Oglov, V. (2008). Cancer care communication: The power to harm and the power to heal? Patient Education & Counseling, 71(34 40). Thorne, S.E., Kuo, M., Armstrong E-A., McPherson, G., Harris, S., & Hislop, G. (2005). Being known: Patient perspectives on human connection in cancer care. Psycho-Oncology, 14, Wells, K.J., Battaglia, T.A., Dudley, D.J., Garcia, R., Greene, A., Calhoun, E., et al. (2008). Patient navigation: State of the art or is it science? Cancer, 113, Willard, C., & Luker, K. (2005). Supportive care in the cancer setting: rhetoric or reality? Palliative Medicine, 19, World Health Organization. (2002). Innovative care for chronic conditions: Building blocks for action. Geneva: World Health Organization (WHO/MNC/CCH/02.01). CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été

7 Les intervenants pivots solutionneront-ils le problème? Les soins infirmiers en oncologie en transition par Sally Thorne et Tracy Truant Abrégé L accès aux soins et leur équité dans l ensemble du système de soins contre le cancer étant devenus des préoccupations grandissantes, on constate un enthousiasme toujours plus vif pour divers types de postes d intervenants pivots afin de faciliter la coordination des soins. Bien que l intention soit digne de louanges, plusieurs stratégies les plus populaires d implantation risquent d accentuer les pressions sur le système et de compliquer encore plus le problème de coordination. Les auteures de cet article affirment qu il est possible de reformuler les motivations sous-tendant le mouvement en faveur de l aide à la navigation des patients en reconnaissant la valeur du travail du personnel infirmier lorsque ce dernier est déployé de façon optimale pour offrir aux patients du soutien tout au long de leur expérience du système de soins contre le cancer. Cet article incite les infirmières en oncologie du Canada à faire la critique des stratégies d aide à la navigation, à les remettre en question et à adopter uniquement celles qui correspondent aux importantes réformes nécessaires pour rendre le système de soins contre le cancer si efficace qu il n aura plus besoin de faire appel à des intervenants pivots externes. Un grand nombre des patients canadiens vivant avec le cancer ou y ayant survécu ont décrit clairement et régulièrement l expérience qu il avait faite du système canadien de soins en cancérologie comme étant fragmentée, parfois inaccessible et «un labyrinthe» (Stratégie canadienne de lutte contre le cancer, 2002). À ce manque de continuité des soins s ajoutent des niveaux élevés de détresse psychosociale causée par la non-satisfaction des besoins d information, la déficience du soutien ou le manque de communication, autant de problèmes qui peuvent avoir une incidence négative sur la qualité de vie et accroître le fardeau des souffrances tout au long de l expérience du cancer (Bultz & Carlson, 2006; Bultz & Holland, 2006; Doll et al., 2003; Fillion et al., 2006; Fitch, Cook & Plante, 2008). Diverses solutions ont été proposées afin de régler ces problèmes, y compris les modèles d aide à la navigation des patients dans le système, et donc d améliorer le vécu du cancer chez les patients et leur famille tout au long de la trajectoire de la maladie. État de la question Depuis que l ardente volonté de bien comprendre «l expérience globale du cancer» a trouvé la place qu elle méritait au sein des objectifs politiques, on a constaté une soudaine poussée d intérêt envers le concept des «intervenants pivots» afin d assurer un accès équitable et efficace aux services liés au cancer et de combler les lacunes de soins au long de la trajectoire du cancer (Fitch, Cook et al., 2008). Le concept des intervenants pivots dans le domaine des soins aux personnes atteintes de cancer a vu le jour il y a environ une vingtaine d années dans des hôpitaux de Harlem en tant que mécanisme permettant de corriger des écarts inacceptables en matière de mortalité par cancer entre la minorité afro-américaine et d autres groupes de population (Darnell, 2007). L idée sous-tendant l implantation des intervenants pivots était d identifier les populations ayant une «mortalité par cancer excessive» et de fournir aux patients appartenant à ces groupes une «assistance personnelle en vue d éliminer les barrières empêchant ces patients d obtenir, en temps opportun, un diagnostic et un traitement adéquats» (Freeman, 2004, p. 76) [traduction libre]. Le concept des intervenants pivots représentait donc une tentative véhémente d éliminer des obstacles culturels, économiques, sociaux et logistiques déclarés tout à fait inacceptables à un diagnostic opportun et à un traitement adéquat de manière à ce que tous les patients bénéficient des meilleures avancées scientifiques et des meilleurs soins de santé. Aux États-Unis, où l accès aux services de santé demeure décidément bien inégal, le concept des intervenants pivots proposé par Freeman a été adopté par divers réformateurs et a fini par être inséré dans le programme politique national. En 2002, le National Cancer Institute a commencé à financer des programmes de recherche ciblant cette approche dans le cadre de son Cancer Disparities Research Partnership Program [Programme de recherche concertée sur les disparités liées au cancer] (Dohan & Schrag, 2005) et a autorisé l affectation de sommes importantes à l appui de la vaste expansion d initiatives similaires (Davenport-Ellis, 2007). Le Dr Freeman, le créateur du concept d intervenant pivot, a été recruté pour diriger les efforts nationaux. Cette initiative a donné naissance à divers projets, ce qui fait que la littérature recèle d un corpus croissant de connaissances relatives au coût, à l efficacité et aux résultats pour le patient d un éventail d approches et de modèles axés sur les intervenants pivots. Le contexte canadien Quoique les disparités fondamentales inhérentes au système de soins de santé américain ne constituent pas le défi le plus important dans le contexte canadien, une sensibilité multiculturelle à la fois commune et puissante a amené de nombreuses équipes de recherche canadiennes à documenter les enjeux entourant les disparités de groupe que nous continuons d observer dans notre pays. Ainsi, une vive inquiétude envers la «politique de la différence» (Browne & Tarlier, 2008) a amené bon nombre de partisans de la réforme du système de santé canadien à se faire les champions du concept des intervenants pivots comme solution optimale afin de fournir un soutien aux patients les plus vulnérables. Étant donné que tous les systèmes reconnaissent qu il y a des individus dont les besoins sont si complexes que leurs soins consomment une proportion démesurée du temps et des ressources du système, il est évident que le concept d intervenants pivots prêtant attention à leurs besoins a de quoi séduire. Seulement, le système de soins de santé canadien se fonde sur l accès équitable de tous les membres de sa population fortement diversifiée à un système subventionné par l État. Décider quelles variations particulières peuvent justifier quels types de droits et privilèges particuliers au sein du système est un problème de politique à la fois complexe et susceptible de susciter la division. Au sujet des auteures Sally Thorne, inf., Ph.D., FCAHS, Professeure et directrice Pour correspondence : École de sciences infirmières, UBC, T Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, C.-B. V6T 2B5 Tél. : ; Téléc. : ; Courriel : Tracy Truant, inf., M.Sc.inf., BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, C.-B. 122 CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

8 À peu près en même temps que les National Institutes of Health (NIH) des É.-U. ont commencé à mettre en place le financement de la recherche en 2002, des fonds fédéraux ont été consacrés, au Canada, au développement de la Stratégie canadienne de lutte contre le cancer (SCLC), dont un des buts était d assurer un accès équitable aux services et ressources à l ensemble des Canadiens atteints de cancer ou à risque de l être. La SCLC, qui est devenue le Partenariat canadien contre le cancer (PCC) depuis, a institué divers «groupes d action» afin d élaborer la stratégie permettant de répondre aux besoins des Canadiens atteints de cancer ou à risque de l être. Le groupe d action Réorientation des efforts (qui s appelle dorénavant Expérience globale du cancer) a été établi afin que les soins de cancérologie ne se limitent plus seulement aux enjeux liés au diagnostic et au traitement de la maladie et qu ils répondent mieux aux besoins informationnels, physiques, psychosociaux, affectifs, spirituels, nutritionnels et pratiques des patients et de leurs proches tout au long de la trajectoire des soins du cancer, depuis le prédiagnostic jusqu à la survivance, aux soins palliatifs et au deuil (Fitch, 2008). Durant les discussions de ces groupes d action d envergure nationale, le rôle d intervenant pivot en cancérologie a été dégagé à titre de stratégie qui permettrait éventuellement de satisfaire les besoins des patients et de leurs familles en matière de soins de soutien dans un système de soins de cancérologie fragmenté, complexe et parfois même inaccessible (Fitch, Cook et al., 2008). Dans cet article, nous nous appuyons sur des résultats précis tirés de la recherche et de notre expérience de la pratique pour réaliser une analyse critique des conséquences, à la fois pour les infirmières et pour les patients, du soutien non critique du virage actuel vers de nouveaux systèmes fondés sur les intervenants pivots. La première de nous deux a développé sa perspective d une implication de longue date dans la recherche axée sur le consommateur et mettant en jeu des individus en quête de soins pour leur cancer dans notre système de soins de santé. La seconde d entre nous apporte le point de vue d une clinicienne et dirigeante de systèmes de pratique infirmière en oncologie et ce, depuis bien des années. Nous avons privilégié le point d intersection de ces perspectives distinctes en vue d éclairer une nouvelle conceptualisation du problème de la fragmentation, de réfléchir de manière critique sur l actuel programme axé sur les intervenants pivots et de proposer des orientations stratégiques de rechange pour les soins infirmiers en oncologie dans le contexte canadien des soins aux personnes atteintes de cancer. La perspective des patients Quoique d un point de vue historique les maladies chroniques et le cancer aient été considérées comme des spécialités infirmières cliniques fondamentalement distinctes, on reconnaît de plus en plus qu elles touchent les mêmes populations et ont de nombreux points communs concernant la prévention, les soins de soutien et la survivance. Lorsqu on demande aux patients ayant le cancer ou des maladies chroniques de raconter leur expérience globale du système de soins de santé et des interactions qu ils ont eues avec ses travailleurs, il n est guère surprenant de voir qu ils décrivent des tendances plutôt similaires relativement à ce qui constitue des problèmes essentiels de navigation dans le système. De plus, ils signalent un ensemble étonnamment similaire de barrières, de problèmes et de défis et ce, non seulement selon des études auprès de populations vulnérables du fait d un désavantage socioculturel ou économique, mais aussi auprès de l éventail complet des patients (Decter & Grosso, 2006). Ainsi, même si certains groupes linguistiques ou ethniques à titre d exemples font face à des défis additionnels bien réels, s y retrouver dans le dédale des soins de santé semble constituer un défi de taille pour l ensemble de la population canadienne. C est un sujet qui mérite une attention particulière dans le contexte de l expérience globale des patients touchés par le cancer. Un récent programme de recherche qualitative portant sur l expérience des patients relativement à la communication dans les soins en cancer, un programme élaboré par la première auteure et publié ailleurs, nous a donné l occasion d examiner les récits de 260 patients de Colombie-Britannique atteints de cancer qui représentaient une vaste gamme de sites tumoraux, de modalités de traitement et de caractéristiques démographiques. Les motifs thématiques relatifs à la question des intervenants pivots qui se sont dégagés de cet ensemble de données ont été discutés en profondeur avec la seconde auteure, dont l engagement expérientiel au sein des systèmes de la chaîne des opérations relatives aux soins en cancer durant cette même période nous faisait profiter de la perspective d une fournisseuse dans un même espace temporel. Une analyse poussée des résultats de l étude dans le contexte des perceptions émanant de l expérience nous a permis de développer et d exposer plus en détail les tendances se dégageant de la recherche et d explorer des interprétations additionnelles. Les idées présentées ci-dessous sont le prolongement de ce dialogue analytique. Où les besoins d aide à la navigation se font-ils sentir? Les lacunes des soins primaires Bien qu il soit largement reconnu qu un système coordonné de soins contre le cancer dépend fondamentalement de soins primaires de haute qualité, tous les Canadiens ne disposent pas d un médecin de famille et ceux qui en ont un peuvent se heurter à d énormes difficultés en matière d accès (Decter & Grosso, 2006). Quoique des réformes du système aient été lancées en vue d étendre le système de soins primaires au-delà du médecin de famille traditionnel, lequel exerce le plus souvent en solo, pour passer à des réseaux communautaires interprofessionnels et intégrés (Institut canadien d information sur la santé, 2008), le processus de réforme a été excessivement long et pénible (Murray et al., 2008). Là où il existe des soins primaires efficacement coordonnés, les personnes atteintes de cancer reçoivent l appui dont elles ont besoin pour accéder aux services de prévention, de dépistage, de détection précoce ainsi qu aux références aux ressources spécialisées. Mais bien trop souvent, les soins primaires sont fournis dans le contexte des cliniques sans rendez-vous axées sur les épisodes de soins d urgence sporadiques plutôt que sur le suivi des patients et sur la continuité des soins. Les services d urgence sont devenus le lieu de prestation des soins primaires par défaut pour ceux et celles qui sont oubliés par le système. Si nous admettons que l organisation actuelle de notre système global repose sur l hypothèse du bon fonctionnement de notre système de soins primaires, nous commençons à saisir l omniprésence et l envergure du problème de navigation et à comprendre que les démarches visant à l aborder dans le contexte des soins aux personnes ayant le cancer doivent débuter longtemps avant que le patient ne reçoive son diagnostic de cancer. Fragmentation des soins spécialisés Une fois qu ils accèdent au système de soins spécialisés contre le cancer, les patients continuent d éprouver des défis sur le plan de la continuité et de la collaboration entre leur équipe de soins contre le cancer et les spécialistes. On reconnaît de plus en plus, dans toutes les disciplines, que ce qui a poussé la science conventionnelle vers l adoption d une spécialisation toujours plus poussée a créé dans un même temps des lacunes majeures dans notre aptitude à voir les situations dans leur ensemble et à comprendre les enjeux au niveau du système (Dorr et al., 2006). Quoique la spécialisation ait sans aucun doute amélioré notre capacité d aborder certaines questions, elle a aussi engendré de nouveaux problèmes. Comme les détenteurs de l expertise d une spécialité donnée s investissent fondamentalement dans l avancement de sa primauté au sein du système et comme la dépendance de la société vis-à-vis des services associés CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été

9 à l expertise débouche sur le pouvoir de persuasion sociale ou sur l influence politique, des conflits de pouvoir et des guerres de territoire ont éclaté et ont influencé les décisions politiques concernant la conception et le remaniement du système de soins de santé (McKay & Crippen, 2008; McMurtry & Bultz, 2005). Bien que l on tende de plus en plus à reconnaître que les systèmes adaptatifs complexes tels que celui des soins de santé exigent, aux tables de discussion des politiques, une coordination et une réflexion au niveau du système global, le système de soins de santé canadien continue de souffrir de la dépendance historique envers la pensée réductionniste avancée par les spécialistes œuvrant dans des systèmes basés sur des sièges de maladie particuliers, des modalités de traitement particulières ou des services particuliers. Tandis que nous déclarons régulièrement la valeur que nous accordons à la coordination des soins et aux résultats pour le patient, la plupart des membres de l équipe de soins de santé traditionnelle ne sont redevables, du point de vue fonctionnel, que de leur propre composante au sein de la constellation des services, et très peu d entre eux ont reçu un quelconque mandat officiel de remarquer, voire d influencer, ce qui arrive aux patients d un service à un autre ou d un secteur à un autre. Pourtant, nous savons fort bien que le problème de la coordination des soins est tenace et qu il nuit grandement aux résultats pour les patients et à leur vécu des soins. «L équipe» de soins contre le cancer Même au sein des équipes interprofessionnelles et spécialisées dans les soins contre le cancer, le manque de collaboration et la fragmentation des soins constituent des problèmes réguliers, les patients étant laissés à eux-mêmes pour s y retrouver dans ce labyrinthe (Reid Ponte, Gross, Winer, Connaughton & Hassinger, 2007). Afin que les patients bénéficient d une continuité dans les soins fournis par les multiples prestataires composant l équipe interprofessionnelle et œuvrant souvent dans des contextes distincts, les prestataires doivent communiquer entre eux, se faire confiance les uns les autres, comprendre et respecter les champs d exercice et les rôles des autres et entretenir un sentiment collectif de responsabilité envers leurs patients, tandis qu ils les guident à travers l épreuve du cancer (Fleissig, Jenkins, Catt & Fallowfield, 2006). De plus, il faut que l équipe unisse ses efforts autour d une approche de soins centrée sur le patient, laquelle inclut l effort intentionnel d adopter consciemment la perspective de l individu concerné sur ce qui compte à ses yeux, et qu elle s occupe de l être humain dans toutes ses dimensions (McMurtry & Bultz, 2005; Willard & Luker, 2005). De cette façon, les équipes interprofessionnelles efficaces collaborent étroitement afin de combler les lacunes confrontant les patients tout au long de la trajectoire du cancer, ce qui diminue la nécessité d avoir des intervenants pivots externes. Autres points faibles du système Le système de soins de santé canadien, tout comme les autres systèmes de soins du monde, s est développé à une époque où les services curatifs dispensés par les médecins et les soins hospitaliers étaient les points de mire exclusifs des politiques publiques en matière de soins de santé (Decter & Grosso, 2006). Les connaissances ont progressé au fil du temps et il est désormais manifeste que la santé est un élément inhérent des sociétés dans lesquelles vivent les êtres humains et que la promotion de la santé, la prévention et la gestion des maladies exercent une bien plus grande influence sur l état de santé global de la société que les interventions destinées à guérir (McKenna & Zohrabian, 2009). En dépit de ces progrès, de nombreux éléments de la structure des services de santé restent solidement alignés sur les hypothèses ayant servi à définir, à l origine, la prestation des services de santé. Par exemple, nos politiques insistent tellement sur la restriction de l accès aux services qu il est inutile de rechercher un quelconque accès; nous considérons souvent que les connaissances sont l apanage des professionnels et non celui des patients; nous organisons la vaste majorité des soins en partant de l hypothèse que le médecin est le meilleur capitaine pour l équipe; enfin, nous préférons la réactivité à la proactivité concernant la prestation des services liés à des problèmes prévisibles chez les patients et la population dans son ensemble (Epping-Jordan, Pruitt, Bengoa & Wagner, 2004). Alors que de nombreux intervenants de santé individuels et même des groupes d intervenants cernent les failles fondamentales de ces éléments du système et s efforcent de les surmonter dans leur pratique quotidienne, leurs efforts sont fréquemment défaits par la résistance globale à la fois structurelle et philosophique au changement qui semble endémique dans les systèmes de soins de santé (Fleissig et al., 2006). Le défi de la communication Quelque part à l intérieur de ces éléments structurels et attitudinaux plutôt massifs du système de soins de santé, se trouvent les travailleurs et les prestataires de soins individuels avec lesquels chaque patient atteint de cancer interagit directement ou indirectement. Pour la plupart des patients, ces intervenants deviennent le «visage» du système de santé et les manifestations humaines de sa capacité et de sa volonté à les aider durant cette période difficile pour eux (Thorne, Kuo et al., 2005). Quoique chacun d entre nous reconnaisse le caractère fondamental de la communication sur le plan de la condition humaine, la communication est si omniprésente qu il est très difficile de l aborder formellement en tant que compétence clinique ou qu attribut du système de services. Bien que nous soyons généralement d accord pour dire que de bonnes communications sont un plus, nous disposons de bien peu de données probantes tangibles qui feraient qu une approche de communication particulière soit universellement préférable à une autre ou que tout épisode de communication auquel nous participons ait une corrélation quelconque avec des résultats cliniques significatifs (Thorne, Hislop, Armstrong & Oglov, 2008). Il en résulte que, jusqu à récemment, la communication figurait principalement sous forme de pieuse déclaration d intention dans les énoncés de valeurs organisationnels et de vagues engagements en termes de normes de pratique, où quasiment aucune attention n y est explicitement accordée dans l évaluation du rendement des professionnels ou du système de santé. Toutefois, les progrès réalisés en analyse des systèmes nous font prendre conscience de façon toujours accrue du rôle de la communication sur le plan de la coordination, de la sécurité des patients et des résultats pour ces derniers. Il semble qu on veuille s intéresser de nouveau à ce que les patients nous disent depuis le début à savoir que la communication compte vraiment (Thorne, Bultz, Baile & SCRN Communication Team, 2005). Vers où nous diriger? En prêtant une oreille attentive à ce que les patients et les groupes de défense des intérêts des patients nous rapportent à propos des discordances dans notre système, nous sommes forcés de reconnaître que nous fonctionnons au sein d un système de soins contre le cancer qui n avait pas été conçu en fonction d une approche centrée sur le patient ni du vécu du cancer par le patient. Dans le contexte de ces problèmes de coordination à répétition, on peut comprendre que les postes d intervenants pivots désignés à cet effet aient vite retenu l attention à titre de solution valable. Cependant, en nous fondant sur notre analyse de la situation effectuée à partir d une multitude d entrevues auprès de patients et de notre travail en première ligne, nous sommes convaincues qu il importe pour les infirmières en oncologie du Canada d effectuer une réflexion critique approfondie sur cette tendance et d examiner la signification qu elle pourrait avoir pour nous, pour le système et, en fin de compte, pour les patients. Nous faisons ici état de nos inquiétudes relatives au contexte dans lequel les modèles d aide à la navi- 124 CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

10 gation des patients ont vu le jour, les conséquences imprévues éventuelles des divers modèles et le problème fondamental inhérent au fait de déléguer cette aide à la navigation à un ensemble désigné de travailleurs de la santé supplémentaires. Critique de l ordre du jour sur la navigation Il ne fait aucun doute que la navigation est devenue le symptôme révélateur des problèmes idéologiques, culturels et organisationnels dont souffre le système. Quoiqu il soit difficile de remettre sérieusement en question la validité éventuelle du rôle d intervenant pivot pour certaines populations vulnérables (Wells et al., 2008), les circonstances particulières qui sont responsables du problème de navigation dans le système de soins de santé canadien sont différentes de celles qui ont donné naissance au mouvement en faveur des intervenants pivots aux É.-U. Plutôt que de refléter une discrimination systémique qui aurait désavantagé une population par rapport à une autre, nos problèmes de coordination émanent, dans une grande part, des attitudes et idéologies bien arrêtées qui enchâssent à jamais les anciens modes de conceptualisation des questions d accès, de champ d exercice et de responsabilité (Organisation mondiale de la Santé, 2002). Ainsi, si nous reconnaissons que ces facteurs touchent la population générale plutôt que quelques individus particulièrement défavorisés, notre engagement envers l équité d accès voudrait que s il faut vraiment avoir des intervenants pivots pour se débrouiller dans le système, c est l éventail complet des groupes ethniques et sociaux, c est-à-dire tous les patients, qui en a besoin. La récente poussée d enthousiasme manifestée par les planificateurs et les administrateurs souhaitant s aligner sur la position des groupes de défense des consommateurs visant à promouvoir un programme d aide à la navigation (Doll et al., 2003; Fischer, Sauaia & Kutner, 2007; Freund et al., 2008; Nguyen & Kagawa-Singer, 2008; Schwaderer & Itano, 2007; Seek & Hogle, 2007) nous paraît être un remède bien superficiel pour tenter de corriger un dysfonctionnement de taille au sein du système. Quoiqu il ne soit pas difficile de comprendre pourquoi des patients angoissés accueilleraient volontiers l idée d avoir un intervenant qui les guiderait au sein d un système sur le point de tomber en panne, nous aimerions faire valoir que le fait de couvrir une blessure mortelle ne fait que retarder la détermination de la cause profonde du saignement. La mise en place d intervenants pivots désignés à cet effet peut donc être perçue comme une tentative bien intentionnée mais éventuellement malavisée d employer une solution symbolique pour ce qui constitue un problème d intégrité du système bien plus vaste et fondamental (Sofaer, 2009; Wells et al., 2008). Ce dont nous avons vraiment besoin est un engagement véritable du secteur public à l égard d un changement d orientation relativement à la manière dont nous menons les opérations en soins de santé (Skrutkowski et al., 2008). Donc, nous devons bien aux Canadiens d essayer d aborder les causes fondamentales des discordances actuelles au lieu de nous borner à tenter d y poser une attelle en instituant surle-champ une nouvelle catégorie de prestataires de soins. Lorsque nous insérons des intervenants pivots désignés à cet effet dans le système, il se peut que nous apportions une amélioration temporaire à certains problèmes, mais aussi que nous contribuions par inadvertance à l apparition d un ensemble de difficultés plus inquiétantes concernant la distribution des ressources humaines, les tensions relationnelles au sein de l équipe de santé et la reddition de comptes dans le système. Par exemple, lorsque les intervenants pivots sont prélevés à même le personnel infirmier en cancérologie, nous posons une contrainte additionnelle sur cette ressource déjà passablement rare, ce qui a pour effet paradoxal d accroître la nécessité d avoir un intervenant pivot externe. Là où des non-professionnels ou des copilotes non spécialisés sont intégrés dans le système à titre de défenseurs des intérêts des patients, ce rôle a le potentiel d engendrer des interactions d opposition notamment une tendance prévisible à mettre la faute sur le dos de prestataires individuels ou de services plutôt que de chercher à saisir les facteurs globaux liés au système. Il est donc possible que nous rehaussions le degré de méfiance que ressentent les patients à l égard de leurs professionnels de la santé et d accroître la fréquence des réactions de contestation lorsque des problèmes surviennent. Il y aurait lieu de s inquiéter lorsque l aide à la navigation non qualifiée professionnellement dépasse son mandat qui consiste à fournir du soutien pour surmonter les obstacles particuliers confrontant les patients fortement défavorisés en collaboration avec une équipe infirmière et se met à jouer un rôle plus large. Ainsi, bien que les intervenants pivots issus de la profession infirmière possèdent les connaissances et les compétences permettant de répondre aux besoins immédiats des patients en matière de navigation et bien que les personnes non qualifiées professionnellement puissent apporter des connaissances expérientielles sur la façon «d exploiter» les systèmes, les deux modèles pourraient augmenter, au niveau du système global, le risque d exacerber les problèmes ayant suscité, en premier lieu, la nécessité d offrir des services d aide à la navigation. Un autre aspect du problème est l hypothèse fondamentale selon laquelle les intervenants pivots réagissent aux systèmes plutôt que de s efforcer d en faire partie inhérente. Dans la majorité des modèles actuellement mis de l avant dans la littérature, les «intervenants pivots» existent en tant que personnes-ressources pour les patients tandis que ces derniers essaient de trouver leur chemin au travers des systèmes et non en tant qu élément intégrant de l équipe de soins de santé (Sofaer, 2009). Ils fonctionnent, essentiellement, comme le bien aimable chauffeur d autocar de tourisme qui veille à ce que vous voyagiez dans la bonne direction, qui vous fait descendre au bon arrêt, qui va même jusqu à vous aider à récupérer vos bagages mais qui ne peut pas vous accompagner jusqu à votre destination finale. Il nous semble que la séparation de la responsabilité d aide à la navigation des patients de la fonction centrale de l équipe interprofessionnelle de soins de santé nous éloigne encore plus de la résolution éventuelle des problèmes systémiques fragmentant les soins. Ainsi, le programme favorisant l aide à la navigation, dans sa conceptualisation et son implantation actuelles, semble exonérer les professionnels de la santé, l équipe de soins de santé et les gestionnaires du système de toute responsabilité en ce qui concerne les causes de ce problème de coordination essentiel, sa perpétuation et, bien entendu, sa résolution. En préconisant l établissement d une nouvelle «industrie artisanale» faisant appel à des spécialistes désignés dont le rôle exclusif consistera à aider les patients à cheminer dans le système, on va créer une strate d activité additionnelle qui exigera elle-même de la coordination et un groupe de travailleurs qui (si l on adopte une perspective cynique, et nos patients manquent rarement de le faire) veillera à ce que le système demeure insuffisamment coordonné pour justifier la continuation de ses services. Ce dont nous avons réellement besoin, au contraire, est une équipe de soins de santé au sein de laquelle la capacité d aide à la navigation est spontanée et totalement intégrée (Fitch, 2008; Fitch, Porter & Page, 2008). Il est bien évident qu il faut qu un des membres d une équipe de soins de santé multidisciplinaire au fonctionnement efficace serve de coordonnateur primaire de la complexité inhérente des composantes information, prise en charge, soutien et suivi de chacune des personnes qui entre dans le système à titre de patient réel ou éventuel, la nécessité de la fonction d aide à la navigation des patients doit malgré tout être une valeur partagée par l ensemble des membres de l équipe. Si nous croyons que des soins globaux et coordonnés optimisent les résultats pour les patients, les enjeux de navigation doivent revêtir la même importance fondamentale que les enjeux de diagnostic, de prise en charge clinique ou de services de soutien au sein des délibérations et des activités de CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été

11 l équipe de soins de santé multidisciplinaire. Il nous paraît donc tout indiqué que les infirmières jouent un rôle de premier plan en abordant l idée générale qu est l aide à la navigation des patients, à comprendre ce qui la motive et ce qu elle vise à résoudre de manière à créer les types de structures et de processus de services qui intégreront cet idéal dans l accomplissement journalier de la pratique professionnelle et dans la conception des systèmes. Examinons ce que cela signifie pour les soins infirmiers Une déconstruction à la fois ouverte et abondamment critique de l évolution du système de soins de santé jusqu à sa forme actuelle est un point de départ utile et instructif. Une fois que nous aurons reconnu les façons dont notre passé politique, professionnel et scientifique détermine fortement nos suppositions et actions actuelles, nous serons dans une bien meilleure position pour faire partie de la solution visant à reconstruire le système qui se donnera comme priorités des enjeux tels que le vécu du patient et la continuité des soins. En comprenant comment on en est arrivé là, on sera plus en mesure de contribuer de façon importante à l élaboration de solutions efficaces et, en ne faisant rien, nous nous faisons complices du maintien continu des obstacles à l optimisation des soins offerts aux patients. Alors que le personnel infirmier hésite rarement à critiquer les autres professions de la santé pour l étroitesse du champ de leur spécialité, notre profession présente elle aussi un bon nombre de ces lacunes. Par exemple, les infirmières sont relativement peu nombreuses à signaler qu elles portent un intérêt particulier aux soins primaires ou en ont une expertise particulière. Cependant, si les soins primaires constituent la structure de coordination fondamentale qui explique la manière dont les patients accèdent à nos services et pourquoi, notre discipline doit transformer en priorité collective la participation active à la résolution des problèmes des soins primaires. En outre, même à l intérieur de spécialités de soins comme l oncologie, la sous-spécialisation des soins infirmiers en champs d exercice tels que la thérapie générale, la radiothérapie et les soins palliatifs peuvent éventuellement intensifier le problème de la fragmentation. Il est essentiel que nous trouvions des moyens de saisir rapidement et de partager continuellement les histoires des patients, depuis leur propre perspective, entre l ensemble des disciplines, des spécialités et des contextes. Il va également sans dire que nous nous devons d œuvrer à l amélioration de la communication entre les différentes composantes du système (notamment les services, les professions et bien sûr, les patients) et de veiller à l existence d un système de transitions adéquat entre les divers intervenants de l équipe. En tant que milieux dont la diversité humaine des «habitants» est un atout célébré haut et fort, les systèmes de soins de santé ne devraient plus tolérer les privilèges accordés aux besoins de certains prestataires au détriment d autres et de ceux des patients. Nous savons bien qu il est impossible de bâtir une équipe de baseball efficace à partir de lanceurs vedettes et d un groupe de préposés aux bâtons. Ce qu il nous faut est un groupe différencié d intervenants compétents qui comprennent et accomplissent chacun leur rôle particulier sans oublier de manifester une connaissance et un souci suffisamment bons des rôles des autres intervenants afin de couvrir toutes les éventualités. Si le courant ne passe pas au sein de l équipe, elle n obtiendra pas de bons résultats, peu importe le nombre de vedettes qu elle compte en son sein. Dans les soins de santé tout comme au baseball, il est nécessaire de partager un engagement profondément ancré et inébranlable envers la primauté de l équipe interprofessionnelle et multidisciplinaire. Outre la communication au sein du système, nous avons un rôle capital à jouer dans la promotion des attentes en matière de communication interpersonnelle. La communication est le contexte dans lequel l information est véhiculée, les attentes guidées et la compassion exprimée. Il est bien connu que les lacunes ou le manque de communication interpersonnelle entre les professionnels et entre ces derniers et les patients sont à l origine de la majorité des échecs et erreurs du système de santé (Epstein & Street, 2007). Puisque nous convenons du caractère central de la communication, nous devons faire en sorte que notre comportement reflète l importance que nous y accordons. Alors que nous n hésiterions pas à agir en cas d erreur de médication, nous avons tendance à garder le silence ou à nous replier sur nous-mêmes face à une erreur de communication, même si elle peut avoir un impact tout aussi dévastateur pour le patient. Nous ne devons jamais oublier qu il est tout à fait dans nos pouvoirs de mettre en œuvre et d exiger une certaine norme de communication dans le cadre de toutes les interactions de soins de santé. D ailleurs, ces valeurs fortes et immuables que sont le travail d équipe et la communication devraient s appliquer à toute personne ayant le privilège de tenir un rôle au sein du système de soins contre le cancer; peu importe que l on soit préposé au stationnement, chef de la direction ou prestataire de services situé entre ces deux extrêmes, nous avons tous un rôle essentiel à jouer en facilitant la prestation de soins axés sur le patient tout au long du cheminement de ce dernier. Stratégies de rechange proposées Comprendre les diagnostics et les cheminements cliniques, interpréter les concepts et l information issus des cultures associées aux diverses disciplines et trouver des moyens d occuper la meilleure position possible en vue de gérer attentivement l expérience des patients constituent le complexe ensemble de compétences qui façonne depuis longtemps le rôle conventionnel de l infirmière au sein du secteur hospitalier. Alors que le monde des soins hospitaliers qui fonctionne en 24/7 offre une place de choix au personnel infirmier pour qu il exerce ces rôles dans le contexte de l hospitalisation, les soins contre le cancer sont prodigués, dans une large mesure, dans des milieux ambulatoires. Mais dans tous ces contextes et surtout dans le contexte ambulatoire, le travail des infirmières en oncologie est souvent structuré de manière à faire l affaire des oncologues ou des services de traitement plutôt que d assurer la coordination des besoins des patients au long de l épreuve du cancer. Quoique beaucoup de groupes d infirmières aient pris conscience de ce problème essentiel et aient fait de grands pas en vue de le résoudre, certaines instances du Canada ont manifesté une résistance significative envers la réorganisation des soins infirmiers au sein des soins ambulatoires, en pensant, à tort, que l appui accordé aux médecins et aux traitements permet d empêcher les erreurs. Pourtant, lorsqu on reconnaît l ampleur des menaces que constitue pour la sécurité des patients le manque de communication et de coordination, il serait logique d essayer de consolider et non pas de réduire les capacités du personnel infirmier en le déployant de manière à ce que la navigation soit facilitée. Ceci exige non seulement la reconnaissance de la valeur de ce rôle au sein du système mais encore des politiques et des pratiques qui donnent au patient un accès direct, lui permettent de déterminer la distribution temporelle au lieu que celle-ci ne soit dictée par les besoins du système et assurent la continuité entre les différents services et secteurs (Schroeder, Trehearne & Ward, 2000). D une part, on reconnaît qu il est nécessaire d appuyer les infirmières en oncologie afin qu elles s organisent pour faciliter ces fonctions, comme le fait l initiative des infirmières pivots en oncologie (IPO) du Québec, mais, d autre part, un nouveau corpus de connaissances vient suggérer que les systèmes peuvent devenir plus efficients et efficaces et que les patients peuvent améliorer leur situation concernant la compréhension qu ils ont de leurs soins et de leur cheminement sécuritaire au fil des transitions (Chasen & Dippenaar, 2008; De Serres & Beauchesne, 2000; Fillion et al., 2006; Mick, 2008; Skrutkowski et al., 2008). Malgré les aspects fort complexes de ce 126 CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

12 type de recherche sur l incidence des rôles infirmiers sur les résultats pour les patients, il importe que les soins infirmiers continuent leurs efforts d évaluation des impacts pour le système et pour les patients des divers modèles d aide à la navigation des patients. Conclusions Il est de plus en plus évident que nous sommes à l aube d une période durant laquelle il sera possible de parler d une même voix en faveur du changement. Notre capacité toujours accrue d extraction, d analyse et d interprétation des données démographiques nous fournit des preuves irréfutables qu un changement significatif du système requiert le plein engagement de tous, depuis la prévention jusqu aux champs de pratique spécialisés et depuis les patients et le grand public jusqu aux professionnels de la santé et aux acteurs gouvernementaux. De plus, un tel changement exigera que l on élimine l effet de fragmentation de la spécialisation et que l on apprenne à conceptualiser les problèmes complexes à des niveaux plus globaux. Au Canada, par exemple, nous constatons des innovations telles que la collaboration entre des organismes de lutte contre diverses maladies chroniques et contre le cancer qui unissent leurs efforts en faveur d un programme stratégique national pour la promotion de la santé et la prévention de la maladie. Tout comme la race humaine commence à prendre conscience du fait que le changement climatique est le genre d enjeu qui exige la participation de tout un chacun si l on veut faire une différence, on commence à peine à réaliser que nous pouvons tous et toutes jouer un rôle vital en orientant les soins de santé vers le genre de système efficient et efficace dont a besoin notre société. Il se peut même que nous découvrions, grâce au catalyseur supplémentaire qu est l actuelle récession économique, des opportunités imprévues de remanier la prestation des soins et d articuler un système de classement des priorités plus réaliste. C est dans cette optique que les infirmières en oncologie se rendent compte, individuellement et collectivement, qu elles font partie intégrante de la qualité du système et ne sont pas de simples pions dans un système contrôlé par d autres. À mesure que de multiples solutions sont apportées au système par les diverses instances de santé du pays, les infirmières en oncologie du Canada doivent s assurer de mettre en place les mécanismes fiables qui leur permettront d effectuer des interprétations critiques de ces tendances et de mobiliser les actions collectives en vue d atteindre les meilleures solutions possibles. Quoique notre profession ait eu tendance, par le passé, à adopter une «mentalité de victime» par rapport à l ordre établi et à l organisation des soins de santé (Kitson, 2004), il est grand temps qu elle choisisse l aplomb et l action stratégique. La volonté enthousiaste d investir dans l aide à la navigation vient confirmer la valeur inhérente de ce qui est généralement considéré comme étant le travail «invisible» du personnel infirmier, une chose dont nous nous faisons les champions depuis longtemps afin de justifier son inclusion dans le programme de planification. Il est possible que ni les patients ni ceux qui sont chargés de la planification et de l administration des systèmes de soins contre le cancer comprennent toujours que le renforcement du système de soins infirmiers est la solution qui s impose, et notre tâche sera donc de veiller à ce qu ils fassent la relation d association entre ce dont ils ont besoin et ce que nous avons à offrir. Il est nécessaire que nous reformulions l idée selon laquelle un système où il faut aider les patients à naviguer est un système dans lequel les infirmières ne font pas encore l objet d un déploiement optimal. Références Browne, A.J., & Tarlier, D.S. (2008). Examining the potential of nurse practitioners from a critical social justice perspective. Nursing Inquiry, 15(2), Que la coordination soit un problème fondamental des soins de santé et qu elle exerce une profonde influence sur les patients et sur les résultats pour ces derniers constituent un refrain bien connu des infirmières. Cela fait plusieurs décennies que nous sommes douloureusement conscientes de ces enjeux et que nous éprouvons une frustration considérable à force de tenter de les résoudre. Cependant, il semblerait qu une nouvelle occasion se présente à nous si l on se fie aux données relativement récentes et au nouvel intérêt porté à un haut niveau (national et international) envers le soutien stratégique aux améliorations du système. Les types de coordination des soins, de travail d équipe interprofessionnelle et des changements conjoints aux soins dans le cadre de la fourniture des services de santé que bon nombre de défenseurs de la politique de santé proposent désormais correspondent bien aux types de tendances que la profession infirmière met de l avant depuis toujours. Les infirmières ne doivent jamais perdre de vue la mince ligne de démarcation entre la défense des intérêts des «soins infirmiers» et de ceux des «patients» dans une perspective distinctement infirmière. Dans le cas présent, il n est nullement question de faire avancer notre profession; nos objectifs naissent de notre conviction inébranlable issue de la perspective distincte et originale des infirmières qui voient de près l expérience que font les patients à la fois de leur cancer et des services de santé auxquels ils accèdent. Nous savons que là où les soins infirmiers reçoivent une place privilégiée au sein d un cadre de coordination des soins bien informé et qu ils sont judicieusement situés pour interpréter les multiples préoccupations des patients dans le contexte de l équipe interprofessionnelle, les infirmières sont les membres des équipes les mieux placés pour faire en sorte qu aucun patient ne se perde en cours de route. En d autres mots, plus le système des soins infirmiers est solide, moins on aura besoin d intervenants pivots externes ou désignés à cet effet. Notre perspective veut que la voix collective des soins infirmiers se fasse entendre à ce moment-charnière de leur histoire afin de s assurer que l organisation de la main-d œuvre au sein du système de soins contre le cancer optimalise complètement les fonctions d individualisation et de coordination des soins infirmiers. Le modèle périmé de l organisation de l exercice des infirmières en oncologie comme «servantes des spécialistes» faisait une grave sous-utilisation des compétences perfectionnées que celles-ci peuvent mettre au service du système et perpétue la fragmentation qui compromet si dangereusement les résultats pour les patients. Notre but collectif, à ce moment précis de notre histoire, est de nous assurer que tous les patients atteints de cancer et membres de la famille puissent bénéficier d un accès direct, opportun et cohérent à des infirmières qui sont déployées de manière à ce qu elles parviennent à bien connaître les patients à titre d individus uniques ayant des horizons distincts, à coordonner intelligemment leurs transitions et à jouer auprès d eux le rôle de courtiers du savoir, impliqués et intégrés, pour l éventail complet de cliniciens, d équipes et de services au sein du système de soins contre le cancer. Pour conclure, les «intervenants pivots» ne résoudront pas le problème. D ailleurs, notre but devrait être la mise au point d un système de soins contre le cancer si efficace qu il n aurait plus besoin de faire appel à des intervenants pivots désignés à cet effet. Ce but ne se réalisera que si nous renforçons les capacités des soins infirmiers par le biais d une reconfiguration créative des rôles et du rehaussement des responsabilités au sein d une équipe de soins interprofessionnelle entièrement fonctionnelle. Bultz, B.D., & Carlson, L.E. (2006). Emotional distress: The sixth vital sign Future directions in cancer care. Psycho-Oncology, 15, CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été

13 Bultz, B.D., & Holland, J.C. (2006). Emotional distress in patients with cancer: The sixth vital sign. Community Oncology, 3(4), Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control. (2002). Supportive care/cancer rehabilitation workgroup: Final report. Ottawa, ON: Author. Chasen, M.R., & Dippenaar, A.P. (2008). Cancer nutrition and rehabilitation: Its time has come! Current Oncology, 15(3), Darnell, J. (2007). Patient navigation: A call to action. Social Work, 52(1), Davenport-Ellis, N. (2007). Access to healthcare: Using data from a non-profit advocacy practice to drive policy change. In J.A.L. Earp, E.A. French, & M.B. Gilkey (Eds.), Patient advocacy for health care quality: Strategies for achieving patient-centered care (pp ). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. De Serres, M., & Beauchesne, N. (2000). L intervenant pivot en oncologie, un rôle d évaluation, d information et de soutien pour le mieux-être des personnes atteintes de cancer [The pivot nurse in oncology, an evaluation, information, and support role for the well-being of people with cancer]. Quebec: Gouvernement du Quebec. Decter, M., & Grosso, F. (2006). Navigating Canada s health care: A user guide to getting the care you need. Toronto: Penguin. Dohan, D., & Schrag, D. (2005). Using navigators to improve care of underserved patients: Current practices and approaches. Cancer, 104(4), Doll, R.D., Stephen, J., Barroetavena, M.C., Linden, W., Poole, G., & Habra, M. (2003). Patient navigation in cancer care: Program delivery and research in British Columbia. Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal, 13(3), 193. Dorr, D.A., Wilcox, A., Burns, L., Brunker, C.P., Narus, S.P., & Clayton, P.D. (2006). Implementing a multidisease chronic care model in primary care using people and technology. Disease Management, 9(1), Epping-Jordan, J.E., Pruitt, S.D., Bengoa, R., & Wagner, E.H. (2004). Improving the quality of health care for chronic conditions. Quality & Safety in Health Care, 13, Epstein, R.M., & Street, R.L. (2007). Patient-centered communication in cancer care: Promoting healing and reducing suffering. Bethesda, MD: NIH Publication No Fillion, L., de Serres, M., Lapointe-Goupil, R., Bairati, I., Gagnon, P., Deschamps, M., et al. (2006). Implantation d une infirmière pivot en oncologie dans un centre hospitalier universitaire. Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie, 16(1), Fischer, S.M., Sauaia, A., & Kutner, J.S. (2007). Patient navigation: A culturally competent strategy to address disparities in palliative care. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 10(5), Fitch, M. I. (2008). Cadre des soins de soutien. Revue canadienne de soins infirmiers en oncologie, 18(1), Fitch, M.I., Cook, S., & Plante, A. (2008). Cancer patient navigation workshops: Improving access to cancer care. A report by the Cancer Journey Action Group. Toronto, ON: Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. Fitch, M.I., Porter, H.B., & Page, B.D. (Eds.). (2008). Supportive care framework: A foundation for person-centred care. Pembroke, ON: Pappin Communications. Fleissig, A., Jenkins, V., Catt, S., & Fallowfield, L. (2006). Multidisciplinary teams in cancer care: Are they effective in the UK? Lancet Oncology, 7, , 7, Freeman, H.P. (2004). Poverty, culture, and social injustice: Determinants of cancer disparities. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 54, Freund, K.M., Battaglia, T.A., Calhoun, E., Dudley, D.J., Fiscella, K., Paskett, E., et al. (2008). National Cancer Institute patient navigation research program: Methods, protocol, and measures. Cancer, 113(12). Institut canadien d information sur la santé (2008). Les soins de santé au Canada Ottawa : ICIS. Kitson, A. (2004). Drawing out leadership [editorial]. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 48(3), 211. McKay, C.A., & Crippen, L. (2008). Collaboration through clinical integration. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 32(2), McKenna, M.T., & Zohrabian, A. (2009). U.S. burden of disease: Past, present and future. Annals of Epidemiology, 19, McMurtry, R., & Bultz, B.D. (2005). Public policy, human consequences: The gap between biomedicine and psychosocial reality. Psycho-Oncology, 14, Mick, J. (2008). Factors affecting the evolution of oncology nursing care. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 12(2), Murray, S., Silver, I., Patel, D., Dupuis, M., Hayes, S.M., & Davis, D. (2008). Community group practices in Canada: Are they ready to reform their practice? Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 28(2), Nguyen, T.-U.N., & Kagawa-Singer, M. (2008). Overcoming barriers to cancer care through health navigation programs. Seminars in Oncology Nursing, 24(4), Organisation mondiale de la Santé. (2003). Des soins novateurs pour les affections chroniques : éléments constitutifs : rapport mondial. Genève. Organisation mondiale de la Santé. (Disponible à : about/icccfrench.pdf) Reid Ponte, P., Gross, A.H., Winer, E., Connaughton, M.J., & Hassinger, J. (2007). Implementing an interdisciplinary governance model in a comprehensive cancer center. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(3), Schroeder, C.A., Trehearne, B., & Ward, D. (2000). Expanded role of nursing in managed care. Part II: Impact on outcomes of costs, quality, provider and patient satisfaction. Nursing Economics, 18(2), Schwaderer, K.A., & Itano, J.K. (2007). Bridging the healthcare divide with patient navigation: Development of a research program to address disparities. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(5), Seek, A.J., & Hogle, W.P. (2007). Modeling a better way: Navigating the healthcare system for patients with lung cancer. Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11(1), Skrutkowski, M., Saucier, A., Eades, M., Swidzinski, M., Ritchie, J., Marchionni, C., et al. (2008). Impact of a pivot nurse in oncology on patients with lung or breast cancer: Symptom distress, fatigue, quality of life, and use of healthcare resources. Oncology Nursing Forum, 35(6), Sofaer, S. (2009). Navigating poorly charted territory: Patient dilemmas in health care nonsystems. Medical Care Research and Review, 66(1), 75S 93S. Thorne, S.E., Bultz, B.D., Baile, W.F., & SCRN Communication Team. (2005). Is there a cost to poor communication in cancer care?: A critical review of the literature. Psycho-Oncology, 14, Thorne, S.E., Hislop, T.G., Armstrong, E.A., & Oglov, V. (2008). Cancer care communication: The power to harm and the power to heal? Patient Education & Counseling, 71(34 40). Thorne, S.E., Kuo, M., Armstrong E-A., McPherson, G., Harris, S., & Hislop, G. (2005). Being known: Patient perspectives on human connection in cancer care. Psycho-Oncology, 14, Wells, K.J., Battaglia, T.A., Dudley, D.J., Garcia, R., Greene, A., Calhoun, E., et al. (2008). Patient navigation: State of the art or is it science? Cancer, 113, Willard, C., & Luker, K. (2005). Supportive care in the cancer setting: rhetoric or reality? Palliative Medicine, 19, CONJ RCSIO Summer/Été 2010

Un ACTIF InConToURnABLE PoUR DEs PARTEnARIATs significatifs. social. An ASSeT To meaningful PARTneRSHIPS

Un ACTIF InConToURnABLE PoUR DEs PARTEnARIATs significatifs. social. An ASSeT To meaningful PARTneRSHIPS Le capital Un ACTIF InConToURnABLE PoUR DEs PARTEnARIATs significatifs social capital An ASSeT To meaningful PARTneRSHIPS Présentation des participants participants presentation Fondation Dufresne et Gauthier

Plus en détail

INTERSECTORAL ACTION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY August 14, 2009

INTERSECTORAL ACTION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY August 14, 2009 INTERSECTORAL ACTION ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY August 14, 2009 ACTION INTERSECTORIELLE SUR L ACTIVITÉ PHYSIQUE CHEZ LES ENFANTS ET LES JEUNES Le 14 aôut, 2009 INTERSECTORAL ACTION ON CHILDREN

Plus en détail

Formation en conduite et gestion de projets. Renforcer les capacités des syndicats en Europe

Formation en conduite et gestion de projets. Renforcer les capacités des syndicats en Europe Formation en conduite et gestion de projets Renforcer les capacités des syndicats en Europe Pourquoi la gestion de projets? Le département Formation de l Institut syndical européen (ETUI, European Trade

Plus en détail

Équipes Santé familiale Promouvoir les les soins de de santé primaire. recrutement externe

Équipes Santé familiale Promouvoir les les soins de de santé primaire. recrutement externe Équipes Équipes Santé Santé familiale familiale Promouvoir Promouvoir les soins les de soins santé de primaire santé primaire Équipes Santé familiale Promouvoir les les soins de de santé primaire Guide

Plus en détail

Assoumta Djimrangaye Coordonnatrice de soutien au développement des affaires Business development support coordinator

Assoumta Djimrangaye Coordonnatrice de soutien au développement des affaires Business development support coordinator 2008-01-28 From: [] Sent: Monday, January 21, 2008 6:58 AM To: Web Administrator BCUC:EX Cc: 'Jean Paquin' Subject: RE: Request for Late Intervenorship - BCHydro Standing Offer C22-1 Dear Bonnie, Please

Plus en détail

AccessLearn Community Group: Introductory Survey. Groupe communautaire AccessLearn : étude introductive. Introduction.

AccessLearn Community Group: Introductory Survey. Groupe communautaire AccessLearn : étude introductive. Introduction. AccessLearn Community Group: Introductory Survey Introduction The W3C Accessible Online Learning Community Group (aka AccessLearn) is a place to discuss issues relating to accessibility and online learning,

Plus en détail

PROJET DE LOI C- BILL C- SECRET SECRET HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES DU CANADA

PROJET DE LOI C- BILL C- SECRET SECRET HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES DU CANADA SECRET C- SECRET C- First Session, Forty-first Parliament, Première session, quarante et unième législature, HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES DU CANADA BILL C- PROJET DE LOI C- An Act to

Plus en détail

Initiative d excellence de l université de Bordeaux. Réunion du Comité stratégique 17-19 décembre 2014. Recommandations

Initiative d excellence de l université de Bordeaux. Réunion du Comité stratégique 17-19 décembre 2014. Recommandations Initiative d excellence de l université de Bordeaux Réunion du Comité stratégique 17-19 décembre 2014 Recommandations 2/1 RECOMMANDATIONS DU COMITE STRATEGIQUE Une feuille de route pour le conseil de gestion

Plus en détail

National Health Survey. Le Luxembourg dans le contexte international

National Health Survey. Le Luxembourg dans le contexte international National Health Survey Le Luxembourg dans le contexte international Ministère de la Santé conférence de presse du 25 février 9 Présentation de l étude 2 Fiche technique Un échantillon de 484 personnes

Plus en détail

Natixis Asset Management Response to the European Commission Green Paper on shadow banking

Natixis Asset Management Response to the European Commission Green Paper on shadow banking European Commission DG MARKT Unit 02 Rue de Spa, 2 1049 Brussels Belgium markt-consultation-shadow-banking@ec.europa.eu 14 th June 2012 Natixis Asset Management Response to the European Commission Green

Plus en détail

Design and creativity in French national and regional policies

Design and creativity in French national and regional policies Design and creativity in French national and regional policies p.01 15-06-09 French Innovation policy Distinction between technological innovation and non-technological innovation (including design) French

Plus en détail

Les licences Creative Commons expliquées aux élèves

Les licences Creative Commons expliquées aux élèves Les licences Creative Commons expliquées aux élèves Source du document : http://framablog.org/index.php/post/2008/03/11/education-b2i-creative-commons Diapo 1 Creative Commons presents : Sharing Creative

Plus en détail

Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Bil.

Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Bil. A usage officiel/for Official Use C(2006)34 C(2006)34 A usage officiel/for Official Use Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Plus en détail

eid Trends in french egovernment Liberty Alliance Workshop April, 20th 2007 French Ministry of Finance, DGME

eid Trends in french egovernment Liberty Alliance Workshop April, 20th 2007 French Ministry of Finance, DGME eid Trends in french egovernment Liberty Alliance Workshop April, 20th 2007 French Ministry of Finance, DGME Agenda What do we have today? What are our plans? What needs to be solved! What do we have today?

Plus en détail

BILL 207 PROJET DE LOI 207

BILL 207 PROJET DE LOI 207 Bill 207 Private Member's Bill Projet de loi 207 Projet de loi d'un député 3 rd Session, 39 th Legislature, Manitoba, 57 Elizabeth II, 2008 3 e session, 39 e législature, Manitoba, 57 Elizabeth II, 2008

Plus en détail

Photo: Sgt Serge Gouin, Rideau Hall Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada represented by the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General

Photo: Sgt Serge Gouin, Rideau Hall Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada represented by the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General One of the pillars of my mandate as governor general of Canada is supporting families and children. This is just one of the reasons why my wife, Sharon, and I are delighted to extend greetings to everyone

Plus en détail

Quatre axes au service de la performance et des mutations Four lines serve the performance and changes

Quatre axes au service de la performance et des mutations Four lines serve the performance and changes Le Centre d Innovation des Technologies sans Contact-EuraRFID (CITC EuraRFID) est un acteur clé en matière de l Internet des Objets et de l Intelligence Ambiante. C est un centre de ressources, d expérimentations

Plus en détail

National Director, Engineering and Maintenance East (Montreal, QC)

National Director, Engineering and Maintenance East (Montreal, QC) National Director, Engineering and Maintenance East (Montreal, QC) Reporting to the General Manager, Engineering and Maintenance, you will provide strategic direction on the support and maintenance of

Plus en détail

Conférence Perspectives pour une nouvelle Agence Méditerranéenne de la Logistique?

Conférence Perspectives pour une nouvelle Agence Méditerranéenne de la Logistique? Conférence Perspectives pour une nouvelle Agence Méditerranéenne de la Logistique? Mardi 3 juin 2014 Younes TAZI Directeur Général Agence Marocaine de Développement de la Logistique younes.tazi@amdl.gov.ma

Plus en détail

Archived Content. Contenu archivé

Archived Content. Contenu archivé ARCHIVED - Archiving Content ARCHIVÉE - Contenu archivé Archived Content Contenu archivé Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject

Plus en détail

ICH Q8, Q9 and Q10. Krishnan R. Tirunellai, Ph. D. Bureau of Pharmaceutical Sciences Therapeutic Products Directorate Health Canada December 4, 2008

ICH Q8, Q9 and Q10. Krishnan R. Tirunellai, Ph. D. Bureau of Pharmaceutical Sciences Therapeutic Products Directorate Health Canada December 4, 2008 ICH Q8, Q9 and Q10 An Opportunity to Build Quality into Product Krishnan R. Tirunellai, Ph. D. Bureau of Pharmaceutical Sciences Therapeutic Products Directorate Health Canada December 4, 2008 Sequence

Plus en détail

ADQ IR Implementation

ADQ IR Implementation ADQ IR Implementation DSNA experience Direction Générale de l Aviation Civile CONTENTS DSNA considerations ADQ objectives The context : a coordinated approach DSNA approach to ADQ implementation The pillars

Plus en détail

Girls and Boys, Women and Men - Filles et garçons, femmes et hommes - respecting differences, promoting equality and sharing responsibility

Girls and Boys, Women and Men - Filles et garçons, femmes et hommes - respecting differences, promoting equality and sharing responsibility Girls and Boys, Women and Men - respecting differences, promoting equality and sharing responsibility Filles et garçons, femmes et hommes - respecter les différences, promouvoir l égalité et partager les

Plus en détail

Les infrastructures des municipalités s effondrent partout au Canada. Canada s cities and towns are crumbling around us

Les infrastructures des municipalités s effondrent partout au Canada. Canada s cities and towns are crumbling around us SKILLED TRADES PLATFORM 2015 PLATEFORME DES MÉTIERS SPÉCIALISÉS 2015 Canada s cities and towns are crumbling around us Canada needs a comprehensive integrated infrastructure program that will eliminate

Plus en détail

French 2208A. French for Healthcare Le français de la santé

French 2208A. French for Healthcare Le français de la santé French 2208A French for Healthcare Le français de la santé Professeur : Heures de bureau : Iryna Punko disponible tous les jours par courriel, sauf le week-end. Préalable - Fr 1900 E ou Fr 1910, ou permission

Plus en détail

JOB DESCRIPTION. Intitulé du poste: REGIONAL SALES MANAGER LITTORAL

JOB DESCRIPTION. Intitulé du poste: REGIONAL SALES MANAGER LITTORAL JOB DESCRIPTION Intitulé du poste: REGIONAL SALES MANAGER LITTORAL Département: COMMERCIAL & MARKETING Chef hiérarchique : DIRECTEUR COMMERCIAL Catégorie l: 10 Lieu de travail : Direction Générale, Voyage

Plus en détail

CNSA Awards 2015. Canadian Nursing Students Association Association des étudiant(e)s infirmier(ère)s du Canada

CNSA Awards 2015. Canadian Nursing Students Association Association des étudiant(e)s infirmier(ère)s du Canada CNSA Awards 2015 All awards must be submitted to awards@cnsa.ca no later than March 15th, 2015, 5pm EST. Only applications that have all of the supporting documentation will be accepted for review. If

Plus en détail

L intégration socioscolaire des jeunes Québécois d origine chinoise : le rôle des écoles ethniques complémentaires

L intégration socioscolaire des jeunes Québécois d origine chinoise : le rôle des écoles ethniques complémentaires L intégration socioscolaire des jeunes Québécois d origine chinoise : le rôle des écoles ethniques complémentaires Ming Sun Université de Montréal Haï Thach École Chinoise (Mandarin) de Montréal Introduction

Plus en détail

Marie Curie Individual Fellowships. Jean Provost Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow, Institut Langevin, ESCPI, INSERM, France

Marie Curie Individual Fellowships. Jean Provost Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow, Institut Langevin, ESCPI, INSERM, France Marie Curie Individual Fellowships Jean Provost Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow, Institut Langevin, ESCPI, INSERM, France Deux Soumissions de Projet Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowship Finance

Plus en détail

A propos de ce livre Ceci est une copie numérique d un ouvrage conservé depuis des générations dans les rayonnages d une bibliothèque avant d être numérisé avec précaution par Google dans le cadre d un

Plus en détail

EN UNE PAGE PLAN STRATÉGIQUE

EN UNE PAGE PLAN STRATÉGIQUE EN UNE PAGE PLAN STRATÉGIQUE PLAN STRATÉGIQUE EN UNE PAGE Nom de l entreprise Votre nom Date VALEUR PRINCIPALES/CROYANCES (Devrait/Devrait pas) RAISON (Pourquoi) OBJECTIFS (- AN) (Où) BUT ( AN) (Quoi)

Plus en détail

Food for thought paper by the Coordinator on Reporting 1 PrepCom 3rd Review Conference 6 décembre 2013

Food for thought paper by the Coordinator on Reporting 1 PrepCom 3rd Review Conference 6 décembre 2013 Food for thought paper by the Coordinator on Reporting 1 PrepCom 3rd Review Conference 6 décembre 2013 (slide 1) Mr President, Reporting and exchange of information have always been a cornerstone of the

Plus en détail

Conférence «Accords transnationaux d entreprise» «Transnational Company Agreements» Conference

Conférence «Accords transnationaux d entreprise» «Transnational Company Agreements» Conference Conférence «Accords transnationaux d entreprise» «Transnational Company Agreements» Conference 13-14 novembre 2008-13th -14th Novembre 2008 Centre des Congrès, Lyon Le rôle des accords d entreprise transnationaux

Plus en détail

Application Form/ Formulaire de demande

Application Form/ Formulaire de demande Application Form/ Formulaire de demande Ecosystem Approaches to Health: Summer Workshop and Field school Approches écosystémiques de la santé: Atelier intensif et stage d été Please submit your application

Plus en détail

Résumé de l évaluation périodique de 2013-2014 des programmes d études supérieures en. Épidémiologie

Résumé de l évaluation périodique de 2013-2014 des programmes d études supérieures en. Épidémiologie Résumé de l évaluation périodique de 2013-2014 des programmes d études supérieures en épidémiologie Préparé par le Comité d évaluation des programmes d études supérieures Faculté des études supérieures

Plus en détail

AINoE. Rapport sur l audition d AINoE Paris, 18 juin 2003

AINoE. Rapport sur l audition d AINoE Paris, 18 juin 2003 AINoE Abstract Interpretation Network of Excellence Patrick COUSOT (ENS, Coordinator) Rapport sur l audition d AINoE Paris, 18 juin 2003 Thématique Rapport sur l audition d AINoE Paris, 18 juin 2003 1

Plus en détail

Photo: Sgt Serge Gouin, Rideau Hall Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada represented by the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General

Photo: Sgt Serge Gouin, Rideau Hall Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada represented by the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General As the father of five children and the grandfather of ten grandchildren, family is especially important to me. I am therefore very pleased to mark National Foster Family Week. Families, whatever their

Plus en détail

LOCAL DEVELOPMENT PILOT PROJECTS PROJETS PILOTES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT LOCAL. www.coe.int/ldpp. Avec le soutien de : Flandre (Belgique), Italie, Slovénie

LOCAL DEVELOPMENT PILOT PROJECTS PROJETS PILOTES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT LOCAL. www.coe.int/ldpp. Avec le soutien de : Flandre (Belgique), Italie, Slovénie LOCAL DEVELOPMENT PILOT PROJECTS PROJETS PILOTES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT LOCAL With the support of: Flanders (Belgium), Italy, Slovenia Avec le soutien de : Flandre (Belgique), Italie, Slovénie www.coe.int/ldpp

Plus en détail

Préconisations pour une gouvernance efficace de la Manche. Pathways for effective governance of the English Channel

Préconisations pour une gouvernance efficace de la Manche. Pathways for effective governance of the English Channel Préconisations pour une gouvernance efficace de la Manche Pathways for effective governance of the English Channel Prochaines étapes vers une gouvernance efficace de la Manche Next steps for effective

Plus en détail

BNP Paribas Personal Finance

BNP Paribas Personal Finance BNP Paribas Personal Finance Financially fragile loan holder prevention program CUSTOMERS IN DIFFICULTY: QUICKER IDENTIFICATION MEANS BETTER SUPPORT Brussels, December 12th 2014 Why BNPP PF has developed

Plus en détail

Construire son projet : Rédiger la partie impacts (2/4) Service Europe Direction des Programmes et de la Formation pour le Sud

Construire son projet : Rédiger la partie impacts (2/4) Service Europe Direction des Programmes et de la Formation pour le Sud Construire son projet : Rédiger la partie impacts (2/4) Service Europe Direction des Programmes et de la Formation pour le Sud Sommaire Construire son projet : Rédiger la partie impacts (2/4) Comment définir

Plus en détail

THE PROMOTION OF FRENCH LANGUAGE SERVICES PROMOTION DES SERVICES EN LANGUE FRANÇAISE

THE PROMOTION OF FRENCH LANGUAGE SERVICES PROMOTION DES SERVICES EN LANGUE FRANÇAISE THE PROMOTION OF FRENCH LANGUAGE SERVICES In the context of the active offer, a coordinated approach to the promotion of French Language Services (FLS) is essential. Implementing an effective promotion

Plus en détail

Institut d Acclimatation et de Management interculturels Institute of Intercultural Management and Acclimatisation

Institut d Acclimatation et de Management interculturels Institute of Intercultural Management and Acclimatisation Institut d Acclimatation et de Management interculturels Institute of Intercultural Management and Acclimatisation www.terresneuves.com Institut d Acclimatation et de Management interculturels Dans un

Plus en détail

Le nouveau référentiel Européen Eric Froment,

Le nouveau référentiel Européen Eric Froment, Le nouveau référentiel Européen Eric Froment, Président du Comité du Registre Européen des Agences d évaluation de l enseignement supérieur -EQAR Workshop on the development of the IEAQA Tunis, 13 June

Plus en détail

Orientations Stratégiques

Orientations Stratégiques Strategic Directions 2010-2015 Orientations Stratégiques Vision A recognized Eastern Counties leader in the provision of exceptional health services. Un chef de file reconnu dans les comtés de l Est pour

Plus en détail

RISK-BASED TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PRACTICE: OVERALL METIIODOLOGY AND A CASE EXAMPLE"' RESUME

RISK-BASED TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PRACTICE: OVERALL METIIODOLOGY AND A CASE EXAMPLE' RESUME RISK-BASED TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PRACTICE: OVERALL METIIODOLOGY AND A CASE EXAMPLE"' ERTUGRULALP BOVAR-CONCORD Etwiromnental, 2 Tippet Rd. Downsviel+) ON M3H 2V2 ABSTRACT We are faced with various types

Plus en détail

C est quoi, Facebook?

C est quoi, Facebook? C est quoi, Facebook? Si tu as plus de 13 ans, tu fais peut-être partie des 750 millions de personnes dans le monde qui ont un compte Facebook? Et si tu es plus jeune, tu as dû entendre parler autour de

Plus en détail

Provide supervision and mentorship, on an ongoing basis, to staff and student interns.

Provide supervision and mentorship, on an ongoing basis, to staff and student interns. Manager, McGill Office of Sustainability, MR7256 Position Summary: McGill University seeks a Sustainability Manager to lead the McGill Office of Sustainability (MOOS). The Sustainability Manager will play

Plus en détail

Politique éditoriale et lignes directrices pour les auteurs

Politique éditoriale et lignes directrices pour les auteurs COMMENT SOUMETTRE UN ARTICLE POUR COACH QUÉBEC Politique éditoriale et lignes directrices pour les auteurs Tous les membres d ICF Québec sont invités à contribuer au contenu de notre infolettre Coach Québec

Plus en détail

Instructions Mozilla Thunderbird Page 1

Instructions Mozilla Thunderbird Page 1 Instructions Mozilla Thunderbird Page 1 Instructions Mozilla Thunderbird Ce manuel est écrit pour les utilisateurs qui font déjà configurer un compte de courrier électronique dans Mozilla Thunderbird et

Plus en détail

Facilitate outside movements for all: Visual impairment-based universal accessibility criteria

Facilitate outside movements for all: Visual impairment-based universal accessibility criteria Facilitate outside movements for all: Visual impairment-based universal accessibility criteria Carole Zabihaylo, Institut Nazareth et Louis-Braille, Longueuil, Canada (presenter); Sophie Lanctôt, company

Plus en détail

Editing and managing Systems engineering processes at Snecma

Editing and managing Systems engineering processes at Snecma Editing and managing Systems engineering processes at Snecma Atego workshop 2014-04-03 Ce document et les informations qu il contient sont la propriété de Ils ne doivent pas être copiés ni communiqués

Plus en détail

Autres termes clés (Other key terms)

Autres termes clés (Other key terms) Autres termes clés (Other key terms) Norme Contrôle qualité des cabinets réalisant des missions d audit ou d examen d états financiers et d autres missions d assurance et de services connexes ( Quality

Plus en détail

conception des messages commerciaux afin qu ils puissent ainsi accroître la portée de leur message.

conception des messages commerciaux afin qu ils puissent ainsi accroître la portée de leur message. RÉSUMÉ Au cours des dernières années, l une des stratégies de communication marketing les plus populaires auprès des gestionnaires pour promouvoir des produits est sans contredit l utilisation du marketing

Plus en détail

1. City of Geneva in context : key facts. 2. Why did the City of Geneva sign the Aalborg Commitments?

1. City of Geneva in context : key facts. 2. Why did the City of Geneva sign the Aalborg Commitments? THE AALBORG COMMITMENTS IN GENEVA: AN ASSESSMENT AT HALF-TIME 1. City of Geneva in context : key facts 2. Why did the City of Geneva sign the Aalborg Commitments? 3. The Aalborg Commitments: are they useful

Plus en détail

Québec WHO Collaborating Centre (CC) for Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention

Québec WHO Collaborating Centre (CC) for Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention Québec WHO Collaborating Centre (CC) for Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention mission The Collaborating Centre seeks to contribute at the international level to research, development and the dissemination

Plus en détail

Rational Team Concert

Rational Team Concert Une gestion de projet agile avec Rational Team Concert Samira Bataouche Consultante, IBM Rational France 1 SCRUM en Bref Events Artifacts Development Team Source: Scrum Handbook 06 Décembre 2012 Agilité?

Plus en détail

Département d organisation et ressources humaines École des sciences de la gestion Université du Québec à Montréal

Département d organisation et ressources humaines École des sciences de la gestion Université du Québec à Montréal Département d organisation et ressources humaines École des sciences de la gestion Université du Québec à Montréal COURSE OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT ORH 1600 - Group 065 Winter

Plus en détail

Situation des fonctionnaires recrutés après le 1er mai 2004 demande des représentants de service

Situation des fonctionnaires recrutés après le 1er mai 2004 demande des représentants de service Situation des fonctionnaires recrutés après le 1er mai 2004 demande des représentants de service Dear colleagues, Please find herebelow the request of Service representatives of the Council of the European

Plus en détail

C est quoi, Facebook?

C est quoi, Facebook? C est quoi, Facebook? aujourd hui l un des sites Internet les plus visités au monde. Si tu as plus de 13 ans, tu fais peut-être partie des 750 millions de personnes dans le monde qui ont une page Facebook?

Plus en détail

Introduction. Règlement général des TPs - Rappel. Objectifs du cours. Génie logiciel. Génie logiciel

Introduction. Règlement général des TPs - Rappel. Objectifs du cours. Génie logiciel. Génie logiciel Introduction Génie logiciel Philippe Dugerdil Génie logiciel «The disciplined application of engineering, scientific and mathematical principles, methods and tools to the economical production of quality

Plus en détail

Please find attached a revised amendment letter, extending the contract until 31 st December 2011.

Please find attached a revised amendment letter, extending the contract until 31 st December 2011. Sent: 11 May 2011 10:53 Subject: Please find attached a revised amendment letter, extending the contract until 31 st December 2011. I look forward to receiving two signed copies of this letter. Sent: 10

Plus en détail

554 Ontario, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1J 3R6 MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES

554 Ontario, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1J 3R6 MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES Posting number: 14-120 Title: Campus: Work Location: Coordinator, Continuing Education Lennoxville Campus 554 Ontario, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, J1J 3R6 Position and Functions: Champlain Regional College

Plus en détail

POSITION DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION DE TRAVAIL

POSITION DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION DE TRAVAIL Supervisor Titre du poste de la superviseure ou du superviseur : Coordinator, Communications & Political Action & Campaigns Coordonnatrice ou coordonnateur de la Section des communications et de l action

Plus en détail

SHORT TERMS. Encourage the sharing of tools/activities linked with quality management in between the projects

SHORT TERMS. Encourage the sharing of tools/activities linked with quality management in between the projects SHORT TERMS Encourage the sharing of tools/activities linked with quality management in between the projects Increase awareness to RMS or other models Sensitize on quality concept Quality control tools

Plus en détail

Niveau débutant/beginner Level

Niveau débutant/beginner Level LE COFFRE À OUTILS/THE ASSESSMENT TOOLKIT: Niveau débutant/beginner Level Sampler/Echantillon Instruments d évaluation formative en français langue seconde Formative Assessment Instruments for French as

Plus en détail

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions GS1 Canada-1WorldSync Partnership Frequently Asked Questions 1. What is the nature of the GS1 Canada-1WorldSync partnership? GS1 Canada has entered into a partnership agreement with 1WorldSync for the

Plus en détail

GCSE Bitesize Controlled Assessment

GCSE Bitesize Controlled Assessment GCSE Bitesize Controlled Assessment Model 2 (for A/A* grade) Question 3 Subject: Topic: French Writing In this document you will find practical help on how to improve your grade. Before you start working

Plus en détail

Discours du Ministre Tassarajen Pillay Chedumbrum. Ministre des Technologies de l'information et de la Communication (TIC) Worshop on Dot.

Discours du Ministre Tassarajen Pillay Chedumbrum. Ministre des Technologies de l'information et de la Communication (TIC) Worshop on Dot. Discours du Ministre Tassarajen Pillay Chedumbrum Ministre des Technologies de l'information et de la Communication (TIC) Worshop on Dot.Mu Date: Jeudi 12 Avril 2012 L heure: 9h15 Venue: Conference Room,

Plus en détail

Usage guidelines. About Google Book Search

Usage guidelines. About Google Book Search This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world s books discoverable online. It has

Plus en détail

A propos de ce livre. Consignes d utilisation

A propos de ce livre. Consignes d utilisation A propos de ce livre Ceci est une copie numérique d un ouvrage conservé depuis des générations dans les rayonnages d une bibliothèque avant d être numérisé avec précaution par Google dans le cadre d un

Plus en détail

RÉSUMÉ DE THÈSE. L implantation des systèmes d'information (SI) organisationnels demeure une tâche difficile

RÉSUMÉ DE THÈSE. L implantation des systèmes d'information (SI) organisationnels demeure une tâche difficile RÉSUMÉ DE THÈSE L implantation des systèmes d'information (SI) organisationnels demeure une tâche difficile avec des estimations de deux projets sur trois peinent à donner un résultat satisfaisant (Nelson,

Plus en détail

1. Subject 1. Objet. 2. Issue 2. Enjeu. 905-1-IPG-070 October 2014 octobre 2014

1. Subject 1. Objet. 2. Issue 2. Enjeu. 905-1-IPG-070 October 2014 octobre 2014 905-1-IPG-070 October 2014 octobre 2014 (New) Danger as a Normal Condition of Employment 905-1-IPG-070 (Nouveau) Danger constituant une Condition normale de l emploi 905-1-IPG-070 1. Subject 1. Objet Clarification

Plus en détail

Technical Capability in SANRAL. Les compétences et capacités techniques du SANRAL. Solutions. Les solutions

Technical Capability in SANRAL. Les compétences et capacités techniques du SANRAL. Solutions. Les solutions Technical Capability in SANRAL Les compétences et capacités techniques du SANRAL Solutions Les solutions 2 3 2007 SANRAL 2007 SANRAL Continuous change Integrated, systemic solutions Global focus Multiple

Plus en détail

IS/07/TOI/164004. http://www.adam-europe.eu/adam/project/view.htm?prj=6140

IS/07/TOI/164004. http://www.adam-europe.eu/adam/project/view.htm?prj=6140 La vente au détail - RetAiL est un cours fondé sur la technologie de l information, un IS/07/TOI/164004 1 Information sur le projet La vente au détail - RetAiL est un cours fondé sur la technologie de

Plus en détail

Action concrète 3 Vulgarisation de la connaissance du droit des femmes et renforcement de leurs capacités à défendre leurs droits

Action concrète 3 Vulgarisation de la connaissance du droit des femmes et renforcement de leurs capacités à défendre leurs droits NGO official partner of UNESCO (consultative status) and in Special consultative status with the United Nations ECOSOC since 2012 Millennia2015, "An action plan for women's empowerment", Foresight research

Plus en détail

SC 27/WG 5 Normes Privacy

SC 27/WG 5 Normes Privacy SC 27/WG 5 Normes Privacy Club 27001 Toulousain 12/12/2014 Lionel VODZISLAWSKY Chief Information Officer l.vodzislawsky@celtipharm.com PRE-CTPM 141212-Club27001 Toulouse normes WG5_LV L organisation de

Plus en détail

RFP 1000162739 and 1000163364 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

RFP 1000162739 and 1000163364 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RFP 1000162739 and 1000163364 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Question 10: The following mandatory and point rated criteria require evidence of work experience within the Canadian Public Sector: M3.1.1.C / M3.1.2.C

Plus en détail

The new consumables catalogue from Medisoft is now updated. Please discover this full overview of all our consumables available to you.

The new consumables catalogue from Medisoft is now updated. Please discover this full overview of all our consumables available to you. General information 120426_CCD_EN_FR Dear Partner, The new consumables catalogue from Medisoft is now updated. Please discover this full overview of all our consumables available to you. To assist navigation

Plus en détail

Objectif : Programme: Projet coordonné par l Office International de l Eau. Evènement labellisé World Water Forum 6

Objectif : Programme: Projet coordonné par l Office International de l Eau. Evènement labellisé World Water Forum 6 Atelier WaterDiss2.0: Valoriser les résultats de la recherche sur l'eau comme catalyseur de l'innovation. Paris, Pollutec, 1 er Décembre 2011 De 14h à 17h Salle 617 Objectif : L'objectif du projet WaterDiss2.0

Plus en détail

Projet de réorganisation des activités de T-Systems France

Projet de réorganisation des activités de T-Systems France Informations aux medias Saint-Denis, France, 13 Février 2013 Projet de réorganisation des activités de T-Systems France T-Systems France a présenté à ses instances représentatives du personnel un projet

Plus en détail

The evolution and consequences of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS)

The evolution and consequences of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) The evolution and consequences of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) Jon Birger Skjærseth Montreal 27.10.08 reproduction doivent être acheminées à Copibec (reproduction papier) Introduction What

Plus en détail

L ouverture des données de la recherche en 2015 : définitions, enjeux, dynamiques

L ouverture des données de la recherche en 2015 : définitions, enjeux, dynamiques L ouverture des données de la recherche en 2015 : définitions, enjeux, dynamiques «Re-analysis is a powerful tool in the review of important studies, and should be supported with data made available by

Plus en détail

Courses on Internal Control and Risk Management. September 2010

Courses on Internal Control and Risk Management. September 2010 Courses on Internal Control and Risk Management Page 1/5 September 2010 EN VERSION 1. Internal Control Standards for Effective Management - Introduction to Internal Control for all staff This introductory

Plus en détail

AUDIT COMMITTEE: TERMS OF REFERENCE

AUDIT COMMITTEE: TERMS OF REFERENCE AUDIT COMMITTEE: TERMS OF REFERENCE PURPOSE The Audit Committee (the Committee), assists the Board of Trustees to fulfill its oversight responsibilities to the Crown, as shareholder, for the following

Plus en détail

GLOBAL COMPACT EXAMPLE

GLOBAL COMPACT EXAMPLE GLOBAL COMPACT EXAMPLE Global Compact Good Practice GROUPE SEB 2004-2005 1/4 FIRM: GROUPE SEB TITLE: GROUPE SEB Purchasing Policy contributing to sustainable development GC PRINCIPLES taken into account:

Plus en détail

6. Les désastres environnementaux sont plus fréquents. 7. On ne recycle pas ses déchets ménagers. 8. Il faut prendre une douche au lieu d un bain.

6. Les désastres environnementaux sont plus fréquents. 7. On ne recycle pas ses déchets ménagers. 8. Il faut prendre une douche au lieu d un bain. 1. Notre planète est menacée! 2. Il faut faire quelque chose! 3. On devrait faire quelque chose. 4. Il y a trop de circulation en ville. 5. L air est pollué. 6. Les désastres environnementaux sont plus

Plus en détail

Population aging : A catastrophe for our health care system?

Population aging : A catastrophe for our health care system? Population aging : A catastrophe for our health care system? Amélie Quesnel-Vallée Dept. of Epidemiology & Dept. of Sociology Lee Soderstrom Dept. of Economics McGill University A catastrophe? Population

Plus en détail

MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE FOR STEEL CONSTRUCTION

MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE FOR STEEL CONSTRUCTION Ficep Group Company MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE FOR STEEL CONSTRUCTION KEEP ADVANCING " Reach your expectations " ABOUT US For 25 years, Steel Projects has developed software for the steel fabrication industry.

Plus en détail

EUDAT and CINES data preservation services. Workshop PREDON Stéphane Coutin 05 nov 2014

EUDAT and CINES data preservation services. Workshop PREDON Stéphane Coutin 05 nov 2014 EUDAT and CINES data preservation services Workshop PREDON Stéphane Coutin 05 nov 2014 Le CINES Basé à Montpellier (Hérault, France) EPA créé en 1999, succédant au CNUSC (Centre National Universitaire

Plus en détail

How to Login to Career Page

How to Login to Career Page How to Login to Career Page BASF Canada July 2013 To view this instruction manual in French, please scroll down to page 16 1 Job Postings How to Login/Create your Profile/Sign Up for Job Posting Notifications

Plus en détail

Sujet de TPE PROPOSITION

Sujet de TPE PROPOSITION Single photon source made of single nanodiamonds This project will consist in studying nanodiamonds as single photon sources. The student will study the emission properties of such systems and will show

Plus en détail

David Marsden Labour market segmentation in Britain: the decline of occupational labour markets and the spread of entry tournaments

David Marsden Labour market segmentation in Britain: the decline of occupational labour markets and the spread of entry tournaments David Marsden Labour market segmentation in Britain: the decline of occupational labour markets and the spread of entry tournaments Article (Accepted version) (Refereed) Original citation: Marsden, David

Plus en détail

Posting number: 14-130. Title: Lennoxville Campus. Work Location:

Posting number: 14-130. Title: Lennoxville Campus. Work Location: Posting number: 14-130 Title: Campus: Work Location: Manager Human Resources Lennoxville Campus 2580 rue College, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, J1M2K3 Champlain Regional College is seeking the services of

Plus en détail

Net-université 2008-1-IS1-LEO05-00110. http://www.adam-europe.eu/adam/project/view.htm?prj=5095

Net-université 2008-1-IS1-LEO05-00110. http://www.adam-europe.eu/adam/project/view.htm?prj=5095 Net-université 2008-1-IS1-LEO05-00110 1 Information sur le projet Titre: Code Projet: Année: 2008 Type de Projet: Statut: Accroche marketing: Net-université 2008-1-IS1-LEO05-00110 Projets de transfert

Plus en détail

2 players Ages 8+ Note: Please keep these instructions for future reference. WARNING. CHOKING HAZARD. Small parts. Not for children under 3 years.

2 players Ages 8+ Note: Please keep these instructions for future reference. WARNING. CHOKING HAZARD. Small parts. Not for children under 3 years. Linja Game Rules 2 players Ages 8+ Published under license from FoxMind Games NV, by: FoxMind Games BV Stadhouderskade 125hs Amsterdam, The Netherlands Distribution in North America: FoxMind USA 2710 Thomes

Plus en détail

The Landscape of Grand Pré Society Request for Proposals: 2014-2015 Audit. For French please see pages 4-6. Purpose

The Landscape of Grand Pré Society Request for Proposals: 2014-2015 Audit. For French please see pages 4-6. Purpose The Landscape of Grand Pré Society Request for Proposals: 2014-2015 Audit For French please see pages 4-6 Purpose The Landscape of Grand Pré Society / Société du Paysage de Grand-Pré is seeking proposals

Plus en détail

Experiences TCM QUALITY MARK. Project management Management systems ISO 9001 ISO 14001 ISO 22000

Experiences TCM QUALITY MARK. Project management Management systems ISO 9001 ISO 14001 ISO 22000 TCM QUALITY MARK Jean-Marc Bachelet Tocema Europe workshop 4 Project management Management systems ISO 9001 ISO 14001 ISO 22000 + lead auditors for certification bodies Experiences Private and state companies,

Plus en détail

Le passé composé. C'est le passé! Tout ça c'est du passé! That's the past! All that's in the past!

Le passé composé. C'est le passé! Tout ça c'est du passé! That's the past! All that's in the past! > Le passé composé le passé composé C'est le passé! Tout ça c'est du passé! That's the past! All that's in the past! «Je suis vieux maintenant, et ma femme est vieille aussi. Nous n'avons pas eu d'enfants.

Plus en détail

BILL C-682 PROJET DE LOI C-682 C-682 C-682 HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES DU CANADA

BILL C-682 PROJET DE LOI C-682 C-682 C-682 HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES DU CANADA C-682 C-682 Second Session, Forty-first Parliament, 62-63-64 Elizabeth II, 2013-2014-201 Deuxième session, quarante et unième législature, 62-63-64 Elizabeth II, 2013-2014-201 HOUSE OF COMMONS OF CANADA

Plus en détail